23

No, you cannot. From the MTG Tournament Rules: 7.2 Card Use in Limited Tournaments Players may add an unlimited number of cards named Plains, Island, Swamp, Mountain, or Forest to their deck and sideboard. They may not add additional snow basic land cards (e.g. Snow-Covered Forest, etc) or Wastes basic land cards, even in formats in ...


19

Make sure you know the policy on rares - will rares be re-drafted at the end? Do you keep all rares you draft? Is it a 'winner-chooses' system? Most of the time you'll keep what you draft, but not always. Talking about the cards you're drafting is generally frowned upon - reading signals and predicting what your opponents are drafting is a big part of the ...


14

It's an acronym telling you which cards you should pick. Cards fall in one of five categories, and you should (usually) pick the card from topmost category (B > R > E > A > D) which is still left in the pack. In a nutshell: Bombs, powerful cards that win a game if unanswered. These can be something that generate an advantage every turn (e.g. The Immortal ...


13

The two player formats I know of are: Solomon draft Winston draft Winchester draft Wizards has some information about these 'casual' formats. Common Setup Each of these draft formats uses a similar setup: 3 packs per player (6 total) Open all the packs, without looking at them, and remove any basic lands then shuffle all the cards together. You should have ...


12

Appendix B of the Tournament Rules provides required and suggested time limits for official events. Check this document for all the details you need. In general: Required minimum game time is 40 minutes. Recommended game time for typical Limited/Constructed Swiss rounds is 50 minutes. WotC recommends giving players 30 minutes to register and construct a ...


11

You can draft at CCGdecks.com, tappedout.net, or drafts.in, and the free client Cockatrice is excellent for playing.


9

It's probably an error, as M12 only had 15 card booster packs (as can be seen in any online store catalog like this one). As far as I could find, the last core set to have smaller boosters was M11 with 6-card packs.


9

I think the question you should be asking is not "when to choose what colours I will play", but rather "when to stop choosing what colours I will play"? Magic, and especially Magic draft, is a game that favours the adaptable. When you make a first pick of a bomb in one colour, that does not commit you to playing that colour, but it suggests that you should ...


9

You cannot. In the sets where they were available, you had to draft them from the packs. In Limited events, you can play Wastes only if it's in your card pool. For Sealed Deck, that means you have to open a Wastes in order to play with it. In Booster Draft, you have to draft Wastes. Figuring out exactly how to pay those {C} costs will be a priority in ...


7

The key to Limited, like Constructed, is to build a deck with a gameplan. Your colors are a part of that, but not the totality of it: any given color can support multiple strategies, and focusing your deck around a particular strategy -- e.g. fast damage, 2-for-1 card advantage, evasive beatdown, just stalling long enough to drop your bomb, &c. -- is ...


7

To provide a different perspective on thesunneversets' answer: the most important concept in cube drafting isn't power level, it's synergy. It's easy to look at your deck after you've drafted - or while you're drafting - and say 'this is chock-full of great cards, it should be awesome.' The problem is that everyone's deck is chock-full of great cards; to ...


7

In my experience, Avacyn Restored Limited is less dependent on drafting clear archetypes than Innistrad. In particular: None of the colors have a super-strong identity associating them with one particular strategy. For example, you could draft small aggressive white beaters, or you could draft Seraph of Dawn and Angelic Wall to try to win on board control. ...


7

In my LGS it's solved this way. 6 players => 1 x 6 7 players => 1 x 7 8 players => 1 x 8 9 players => 1 x 9 10 players => 1 x 10 11 players => 1 x 11 12 players => 2 x 6 13 players => 1 x 6 + 1 x 7 14 players => 1 x 6 + 1 x 8 15 players => 1 x 7 + 1 x 8 16 players => 2 x 8 17 players => 1 x 8 + 1 x 9 18 players => 3 x 6 19 players => 2 x 6 + 1 ...


6

You can use Magic Workstation. It works well and you always find player of different levels.


6

Marshall Sutcliffe has an interesting article about CABS Theory on magic.wizards.com. This post is a short extract of the original article. The original article offers much more ; go read it. He uses an acronym CABS, which is short for "Cards (that) Affect the Board State", to remember what you should be picking. Most people don't factor in whether a card ...


6

The card itself states what to do in the case of a tie. In the example of Council's Judgement, it says "or tied for the most votes". This means that if 2 different permanents gets 1 vote each, then both of them will be exiled because they both are tied for the most votes. This is not only an issue in 2 players, but could occur with any number of players.


6

Not only are you allowed to share cards, you are as a team considered to have a single card pool that you build your decks from. Section 9.6 of the Tournament rules says Two-Headed Giant Limited Rules All the rules for Limited Tournaments (Section 7) apply, except as described below. The DCI recommends that each team receive eight boosters per team for Two-...


6

It is perfectly acceptable to observe other matches. If you are not currently playing, and you are not a judge, then you are a spectator by definition. There are a few rules governing spectators mentioned in the Tournament Rules. Players may request (via a judge) that you not observe their matches. You may not make notes while drafting. You may not place ...


6

Yes, it would be cheating. Your tournament organizer must either provide the booster packs or randomly distribute them before the drafting phase. If that does not happen and you try to exploit that fact, you are cheating. Since you are well aware that your packs would give you an unfair advantage, you would be cheating. Whether or not your tournament ...


6

The number of players in a draft certainly affects the draft, but the effect is symmetrical; all players are affected similarly. One reason that 8 players is optimal is because the pairings work out perfectly; no one is going to get paired up/down. From your opening pack you get: the 1st, 7th and 13th pick in a 6 person draft the 1st, and 9th pick in an 8 ...


6

Not at all. The cards you're shown in a draft on MTG Arena are a simulated version of what you would see in a paper draft of MTG cards. This means that, for each pack, with some exceptions, there will always be 10 commons, 3 uncommons, and 1 rare/mythic rare. As the draft goes around, simulated players (these would be real players in a paper draft) pick ...


5

I had fun with Winchester Draft a couple of times. The article mentions Winston Draft, which I've never tried.


5

Wizards of the Coast designs sets for specific Limited environments. The intended draft format for Lorwyn/Shadowmoor block was: Lorwyn draft: 3x Lorwyn Morningtide draft: 2x Lorwyn, 1x Morningtide Shadowmoor draft: 3x Shadowmoor Eventide draft: 2x Shadowmoor, 1x Eventide Cards from the two halves of the set were not intended to be drafted together. The ...


5

Since multiplayer games tend to run longer than single-player matches, it's hard to do as many rounds as you would for e.g. a standard pod of 8. The scheme we've come up with at my LGS is to run two rounds with swiss pairing and per-game prize support: Do the draft itself. For convenience, I'm going to presume a perfect 8-person pod here. Break into two 4-...


4

You pretty much answered this question already. While I haven't heard of 4-pack 30 card sealed yet,I would say this is the format that is the most dependent on luck. A single bomb in a 30 card deck has a much larger impact than in a 40 card deck, for 2 reasons: 1) With 4 packs, opponents have a lower chance to equalize a single bomb of yours with at least 2 ...


4

Pro player Paulo Vitor Damo da Rosa recently wrote an interesting article on the subject where he states: There are no archetypes This is kind of an exaggeration – obviously there are archetypes – but this is so different than previous draft formats that I think the exaggeration is warranted to get the point across. For most of the past decade, there ...


4

We wanted something more like a "real" draft, where there is blindness, but not as much randomness as in Winston. So, our approach: make two stacks of 42 cards (3 boosters), one for each player. Each player draws 5 cards off the top and selects one, then puts the remaining 4 cards aside in a new pile. Continue this until you have emptied the pile. In the ...


4

First off, what is a bomb? According to a Limited Information article it is ... a powerful, game-ending, stabilizing card." though the author does admit that other people might have slightly different definitions. The MTG Salvation Wiki describes a bomb as "...a card, generally used in conjunction with Limited play, that always makes a large card impact on a ...


4

It depends on how you want to build your packs. If you plan to build proper packs then the choices are different then if you just want to grab random cards. The best experience would be from the former so I will go off it. The double faced cards were seeded from a sheet with a single mythic, two of each rare, six of each uncommon and eleven and each common. ...


4

I largely agree with esoterik's answer, however would like to elaborate on the strict number advantage, which I feel is the more accurate analysis and describes the inherent differences between player numbers in the format better without making assumptions about their skill level (which is how I read the question). Basic Analysis of the Draft Format The ...


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