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First, the source: section 8 of the Comprehensive Rules covers multiplayer games, and rule 800.4a deals with the consequences of one player being eliminated: 800.4a. When a player leaves the game, all objects (see rule 109) owned by that player leave the game, any effects which give that player control of any objects or players end, and all spells and ...


25

You'll win the game. Once your opponent leaves, and you're the last person standing, you win immediately. From the rules on Ending the Game: 104.1. A game ends immediately when a player wins, when the game is a draw, or when the game is restarted. 104.2. There are several ways to win the game. 104.2a A player still in the game wins the game if ...


16

Don't expect the game to end quickly. In a MtG duel, there is a deck archetype called Aggro. Aggro decks use extremely low converted mana cost (CMC) cards that can efficiently deal damage to quickly reduce their opponents life from 20 to 0. This type of deck is trying to gain a tempo advantage. Aggro decks typically don't win in multiplayer free for all, ...


16

No, the turn continues as normal, without that player. 800.4i If a player leaves the game during their turn, that turn continues to its completion without an active player. If the active player would receive priority, instead the next player in turn order receives priority, or the top object on the stack resolves, or the phase or step ends, whichever is ...


15

Can I "play" a token? No. You can still produce zombie tokens even if you are not allowed to play Zombie. "Play" has a very specific meaning in Magic: 701.11b To play a card means to play that card as a land or to cast that card as a spell, whichever is appropriate. When instructed to name a card, can I name a token instead? It depends. If a token has ...


15

No, they cannot change who they are attacking. Once a creature has been declared as an attacker you cannot change who (or what) it is attacking. Say instead of attacking Player B directly you attack their Planeswalker, but before damage gets dealt they Boomerang the Planeswalker back to their hand. You would not be able to redirect your creatures attack to ...


13

In Commander, it's typical for decks of all colors to run "mana rocks" -- artifacts that generate mana. Some of the popular ones are: Sol Ring, Mind Stone, Thran Dynamo, Darksteel Ingot, Worn Powerstone, Dreamstone Hedron, Mana Vault, Mana Crypt. Some of these help with mana-fixing, others just produce colorless mana; the former is often helpful in a multi-...


13

The controlling player cannot reveal the controlled player's hand. Rule 714.5b says The controller of another player can’t make choices or decisions for that player that aren’t called for by the rules or by any objects. The controller also can’t make any choices or decisions for the player that would be called for by the tournament rules. Revealing your ...


13

If you control another player, you essentially are that player for purposes of gameplay. You make all gameplay decisions for that player and can see all in-game cards that the controlled player could see. Basically, imagine playing against yourself with your opponent's deck for the duration of the control change. Because of effects that allow a player to ...


12

You are correct, players A and C each create a Gold token. The ability "Whenever enchanted player is attacked, create a colorless artifact token named Gold" applies to the player that controls Curse of Opulence, which is player A in this case. The other part of the ability, "Each opponent attacking that player does the same" makes it so that player C also ...


12

You win. Sower of Discord's third ability is a triggered ability, so the life loss taken by you would happen "long after" the game has already ended. State-based actions are what causes a player to lose for having a non-positive life total. 704.5. The state-based actions are as follows: 704.5a If a player has 0 or less life, that player loses the ...


11

One of the rulings for Furnace of Rath states: If multiple effects modify how damage will be dealt, the player who would be dealt damage or the controller of the creature that would be dealt damage chooses the order to apply the effects. For example, Mending Hands says, "Prevent the next 4 damage that would be dealt to target creature or player this turn."...


9

It's a draw. Whenever all remaining players lose at the same time, the game ends in a draw. From the Basic Rulebook, under "Winning the Game: If both players would lose the game at the same time, the game is a draw—nobody wins. Similar information is repeated under the glossary for "Life total" and "draw the game".


9

Player C can win with Blood Artist's triggered ability. After First Strike damage, Player A would gain priority, so state-based actions are checked. The following ones actually happen: 704.5a If a player has 0 or less life, he or she loses the game. (Player B, in this case) 704.5g If a creature has toughness greater than 0, and the total damage ...


9

As you have shown in your question, it is a house rule. That said, it's not a particularly surprising house rule as generally the kind of concession this would arise in could easily be a jerkish move, though not necessarily. 104.3a A player can concede the game at any time. A player who concedes leaves the game immediately. He or she loses the game. ...


9

It would seem that the trigger does not even go off unless both the player currently taking their turn and the previous turn were both inside your range of influence. 801.7. A triggered ability doesn‘t trigger unless its trigger event happens entirely within the range of influence of its source‘s controller. On turns that the trigger does go off, one ...


9

The order in which replacement effects are applied to an event is chosen by the player or controller affected. In this case, the event in question is your creature dying, so you choose which replacement effect applies first, and which opponent gets the token. The specific rule that covers this is rule 616.1: If two or more replacement and/or prevention ...


8

Players leave the game as a state based effect, the next time any player would receive priority if their life total is zero or less. 104.3b If a player’s life total is 0 or less, he or she loses the game the next time a player would receive priority. (This is a state-based action. See rule 704.) In the above example, after you declared your creatures as ...


7

It sounds as if you were playing something similar to the Star format (though it sounds like you didn't use the color restrictions). The comprehensive rules don't have anything about it, so we have to rely on the group just agreeing on an interpretation. Wizards did list the rules for many popular casual MtG formats in an article written in 2008. Players ...


7

A good resource in this situation is http://chat.magicjudges.org/mtgrules/ - their answer follows: Both them losing and Wurmcoil dying happens as part of the same "set" of State Based Actions. Wurmcoil will hit the graveyard and they will lose at the same time. Wurmcoil will still trigger in that case since it did, in fact, die. Edit: Relevant rules ...


7

Its copied abilities would definitely work, even though Lazav is still named Lazav. See rule 201.4: 201.4. Text that refers to the object it’s on by name means just that particular object and not any other objects with that name, regardless of any name changes caused by game effects. 201.4b If an ability of an object refers to that object by name, ...


7

Yes there are currently 6 other commanders that have abilities that function in the command zone, though all of them were created for the preconstructed commander decks. They even eventually worded abilities that function in the command zone with "Eminence" Derevi, Empyrial Tactician - Derevi has the ability "{G}{W}{U}{1}: Put Derevi onto the battlefield ...


7

The excess damage is dealt to the blocker. Yes, it's possible to assign more damage to a creature than is necessary to kill it. This matters, for example, for Lifelink. A creature without trample must assign all of its damage to its blockers. 510.1c A blocked creature assigns its combat damage to the creatures blocking it. If no creatures are currently ...


7

Power level is very subjective, and its main purpose is to communicate gameplay expectations. I personally think that trying to create a very refined algorithm for grading power levels misses the point of what the power level is trying to achieve. Power level is based mostly on comparing decks to each other. Because Commander is mostly a casual, ...


6

No, the Pridemate's ability doesn't trigger when your teammate gains life, because while your shared life total goes up it is not you gaining life. Two-Headed Giant FAQ: How does damage, loss of life, and gaining life work with the single life total for the team? Damage, loss of life, and gaining life happens to each player individually. The result is ...


6

The player who controls the spell chooses the opponent. There could be some political issues here, but no more so than if you had a friend in a 4-player game who refused to attack you because you were friends. He's still your opponent in the game, so he should be making the decisions that will give him the best chance of winning; not trying to help you. ...


6

No, you cannot, because the card specifically states that each copy targets "one of those creatures." So the target for the copy is specified in the rules of the card itself, there is no option to choose a different target. Arc Lightning is the same, but Liquid Fire works a little differently. With liquid fire, there is only one target, the creature. How ...


6

You will not get to count the counters from the player who has lost. When a player loses the game in multiplayer, that player leaves the game, which means they are not in any way a part of the game. They are no longer an opponent, they no longer have poison counters, they do not exist at all as far as the game is concerned. 800.4. Unlike two-player games,...


6

If you look at the link of Sorin Markov and scroll down, you'll find a list of rulings that answer this question quite thoroughly. For more details, see the link. In summary: 10/1/2009. While controlling another player, you make all choices and decisions that player is allowed to make or is told to make during that turn. [...] You can’t make the ...


6

As far as I have ever seen, there's no official Power Level. There are, however, a number of factors that influence win rates. Keep in mind none of these are absolute, they are just guidelines, and your own experience will depend on the skill of the player 'piloting' the deck. There is an informal list of Commanders by Tier. Lower Tier commanders have ...


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