34

Priority can matter, but only in rare corner cases. Here are the main types of situations where priority matters. Some of these are pretty obscure. Split second cards It's your turn. You have in hand Dark Depths and Vampire Hexmage for the infamous Marit Lage combo. Your opponent has Sudden Death in hand. Can you summon Marit Lage? The answer is yes. ...


20

Considering only the cards mentioned, and assuming you chose the proper targets for the triggered abilities, your opponent is guaranteed to lose once you block with the Fiend. The active player is the player taking the current turn [CR 102.1], not the player with priority or anything like that. So in that entire sequence, there is no way for your opponent's ...


14

Preface While the answer by the OP is a pretty good list of examples when priority matters, the question as posed is more about "Stack vs Priority", as in, "Do the rules need the priority system when it already has the Stack?". A philosophical question warrants a philosophical answer. While such an answer is buried inside the comments, chat, and OP's answer,...


12

Your opponent gets to put their silver on the stack first. However, you can then add your incinerate to the stack, targetting their Root Silver. Incinerate New Sliver You can then pass so the Incinerate resolves, destroying the Root Sliver. Stack is now: New Sliver Then you cast your counterspell so the stack is Counterspell New Sliver Your ...


11

If I play Krenko Mob Boss and retain priority [...] First, let's clear up this confusion. If you cast Krenko and retain priority, then Krenko has not resolved. You need to wait until after Krenko resolves, at which point you will have priority because you are the active player. Now, after Krenko resolves, you decide to equip Swiftfoot Boots to Krenko. Equip ...


9

You hold priority when you need to take additional actions before a previous action resolves, and those additional actions depend on the previous actions. That is the general answer to your question. The list of specific examples would be endless, and so I'll only provide one example that falls outside of the "spell copying/redirect" category. Example: ...


9

This goes to the basics of how the stack works. After a spell or ability has been played, but before it resolves ("takes effect") it goes on the stack. Then all players have the opportunity to play instants, spells with flash and activated abilities. If anyone does, that spell or ability goes on the stack on top of everything already there. Only when all ...


9

But now we're wondering—is there anything that could have made me not win in this situation? Of course. Them casting Shock targeting you, them casting Healing Salve targeting themselves, etc. For example, could I have activated an ability or played an instant, changing who was the active player at the crucial moment? Depends on what you mean by "...


8

If you wait for your opponent to respond and your opponent has no response, your lightning bolt resolves before you can twincast it. 608.1. Each time all players pass in succession, the spell or ability on top of the stack resolves. (See rule 609, “Effects.”) You'll only get a chance to copy the bolt if they respond, or if you cast both spells before ...


8

The description you wrote is very similar to what happens, but there are some minor differences. Here's the actual exact sequence of events, starting with the spell. The spell resolves, dealing 3 damage to each creature. The Trapjaw Tyrant's triggered ability triggers. State-based actions are evaluated. Each creature that was dealt lethal damage dies. The ...


7

You can counter the original Counterspell with your copy, ensuring that at least two copies of Wheel of Fortune resolve. This is true no matter whose turn it is or which opponent casts the Counterspell. The important thing to note here is that Hive Mind's ability is a triggered ability that triggers when a player casts a spell. The first and last steps of ...


6

Not normally. When ever a spell resolves, per the rules of magic, the active player gets priority. 117.3b The active player receives priority after a spell or ability (other than a mana ability) resolves. This means that your opponent who cast Lurrus will almost always have the opportunity to cast a spell before you get priority to try and remove Lurrus, ...


6

Yes, priority can definitely matter. The classic example is Terry Borer's mistake involving Grave Servitude in the quarter-finals of Pro Tour Atlanta, 1996. An error which cost him the game, the match, and arguably the title of Pro Tour Player of the Year: Borer was playing against fellow Canadian Darwin Kastle. Terry had the win in his hand. All he had to ...


5

The only time I've ever had to do this is playing around Extirpate. In the particular scenario that came up, my opponent had just milled a large portion of my deck, including a lightning bolt (me playing burn). I had two more in my hand. If I cast one and try to let it resolve, my opponent can Extirpate Lightning Bolt and remove the other from my hand. My ...


4

Assuming you control both the Mortus Strider and the Unholy Indenture, you get to choose which ability will resolve first. If your opponent controls the Unholy Indenture, it depends on whose turn it is. The position of spells and abilities on the stack decide the order in which they resolve. Players can only cast one spell at a time, so their order is never ...


3

Unfortunately, the rules say 117.3b The active player receives priority after a spell or ability (other than a mana ability) resolves. So if it is your opponent's turn, then once Lurrus has finished resolving and entered the battlefield, your opponent receives priority, and keeps it until they have declared that they will cast no more spells and activate ...


3

Yes, you get to create a Cat token. Note that the ability is a triggered ability, not an activated ability. This is an important distinction. Handling Triggered Abilities 603.1. Triggered abilities have a trigger condition and an effect. They are written as “[When/Whenever/At] [trigger condition or event], [effect]. [Instructions (if any).]” 603.2. ...


3

I think the two different pieces here are in some sense independent. The opponent's floating mana makes you want to act in the beginning of combat step instead of the main phase, and holding a split second spell makes you want to act first in the beginning of combat step instead of waiting for your opponent to act. Holding up mana here isn't necessarily ...


2

Question 1A Reconnaissance can in fact be activated after combat damage. The reason for this is because after damage is dealt, all players receive priority before creatures are removed from combat. Question 1B Berserk contains the text Cast this spell only before the combat damage step So you wouldn't be able to cast it after the creature deals ...


2

It's contrived, but.... You have an Electrostatic Field on the battlefield. Maybe even you and your opponent both do, and you are both at one life. You also have an Anointed Deacon on the battlefield (or any permanent with a "beginning of combat" triggered ability). You and your opponent both have a Trickbind in hand. Whoever gets priority first can cast ...


1

The answer is: It depends who's turn it was and who controlled what. For the purposes of this I assume different players control the aura and the creature (the question implies that but is not explicit) We'll say Player A controls the creature and Player B controls the aura. These are triggered abilities, both triggering at the same time from the same event....


1

I played a game once with Baral, Chief of Compliance on the board, I desperately needed to cycle for an answer so I casted a spell, and while holding priority, was able to counter my own spell to draw a card


1

There is at least one corner case that I know of where it is important. In certain legacy storm decks, it is really important that when you play your Infernal Tutor you keep priority and crack your Lion's Eye Diamond in Response. If you don't do that your opponent can just pass priority and then the spell resolves which does not let you tutor for anything.


1

Each object on the stack, each phase (except Untap), and each step have this exchange of players passing priority. It is commonly referred to as "APNAP" or "Active Player and Non-Active Player." The active player is the player who is currently taking their turn. Whenever a phase or step is entered, any abilities from cards that try to go on the stack will do ...


1

Krenko will be returned to your hand. However it should be noted that you cannot cast a Swiftfooot Boots on any creature, you need to have already cast the boots then pay the equip cost to attach them. Priority doesn't seem to work the way that you think it does, the Unsummon does not happen at the same time as the Equip, it happens in response to it. If ...


1

Casting a spell uses the stack just like activating an ability does. Your opponent will get an opportunity to respond with Unsummon. Because Unsummon is instant speed, it can be cast when there are other items on the stack. However, casting an artifact spell or equipping a creature with equipment is a sorcery speed action and therefore can only be cast on ...


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