20

A creature is destroyed when a resolved spell or effect says so (destruction by effect), or when the total damage it received this turn from anywhere is equal to or greater than its current toughness (destruction by game rules). At any time you can regenerate a creature with an appropriate spell or effect. The only condition is that the regeneration has to ...


16

Those two spells Destroy. Regeneration replaces destruction, which means the destruction doesn't happen, which means it doesn't cause anything to go to the graveyard. If you cast the regeneration mode of Golgari Charm in response to Doom Blade or Supreme Verdict, your Hydras will be safe. They will not lose counters, enchantments, or equipment; they don't ...


15

No, a creature cannot use Regenerate to avoid being countered. When your friend casts Mortivore, it goes on the Stack as a Spell. It is not a Creature until the spell resolves and leaves the stack. Counterspell uses the Counter keyword action, which removes a spell from the stack. This means the spell never resolves and does not have any effect. In the ...


14

Well, no. Regenerate has a very specific meaning. From the Comprehensive rules: 701.12a If the effect of a resolving spell or ability regenerates a permanent, it creates a replacement effect that protects the permanent the next time it would be destroyed this turn. In this case, “Regenerate [permanent]” means “The next time [permanent] would be destroyed ...


12

There's no possible interaction between Counterspell and regeneration. You can't use Counterspell on a creature (a creature card or token on the battlefield), only on a creature spell (a creature card or copy thereof on the stack). Yet Mortivore's activated ability can only be activated when it's a permanent, not a spell. This is the case for most ...


11

Summary: Annihilating Fire replaces the effect of destruction, but regeneration replaces the destruction itself. Annihilating Fire would not exile. Replacement effects are not applied in APNAP order; they are applied in the order the affected object's controller or the affected player decides [CR 616.1]. But that doesn't matter here. The effect of the ...


10

Regenerate will not save the creature. The state based action that moves the creature to the graveyard in this case does not technically destroy it. 704.5f If a creature has toughness 0 or less, it’s put into its owner’s graveyard. Regeneration can’t replace this event. Even if regeneration could replace this kind of death, the creature would simply die ...


9

Responding to your edit: What I really wanted to know is that if someone uses for example Shock on my creature can I say at that moment "Ok, I will spend 2 mana and regenerate my creature" or when that Shock is played it is resolved immediately any my creature is destroyed (assuming that it has 1 toughness and no regeneration shield on it) How ...


8

In the declare blockers step, the attacker must specify the order of the blocking creatures. What that means, in the scope of your question, is that the owner of the 5/5 creature must declare which of your 4/4s he is going to deal damage to first. As such, you have a pretty good idea which creature you want to regenerate: the one the attacker put first ...


7

I think the confusion stems from a belief that regeneration causes the creature to leave the battlefield, but come back(like persist does). But the rules just says to remove the damage and remove the creature from combat Instead of destroying it(it's a replacement effect). It is continuously on the battlefield during the entire process.


6

I copied the answer from here, where a similar question was answered by Daniel Kitachewsky. Daniel is a high-level Judge from France, and the goto-guy when judges don't know the answer. Planar Cleansing resolves and destroys all creatures, artifacts and enchantments. I have a Runeclaw Bears enchanted with Boar Umbra. The replacement effect of the ...


3

Ok, expanding on the line of reasoning from Ikegami in that other question, the events produced by Planar Cleansing: Destroy all nonland permanents are effectively Destroy Runeclaw Bear and destroy Hyena Umbra Totem armor can replace the first event: (Remove all damage from Runeclaw Bear and destroy Hyena Umbra) and destroy Hyena Umbra. but the ...


3

The creature is tapped when it would be destroyed (this turn). The most common example of this is: You attack with your creature (whom has a regenerate ability) The enemy blocks with a creature with the same or more power than your creature's toughness You recognize that your creature will die if it is not regenerated, so you activate the regenerate ability ...


2

Regenerate means "The next time this creature would be destroyed this turn, instead tap it, remove all damage done to it, and if it is in combat, remove it from combat." Countering does not destroy, partially because "destroy", like many words in magic, is a word with a very precise meaning and countering doesn't say that it destroys, and partially because ...


2

You cannot regenerate a countered creature. As a general rule, unless an ability only makes sense when applied in another zone (e.g. "return this card from graveyard to hand" clearly must work in the graveyard and "cannot be countered" must function on the stack) then that ability only applies while the card is a permanent on the battlefield. Regenerate ...


2

What I really wanted to know is that if someone uses for example Shock on my creature can I say at that moment "Ok, I will spend 2 mana and regenerate my creature" Short answer: Yes. Longer answer: I linked this nice article as a comment to your question that has a very thorough discussion, with examples, of how the Stack and Priority works in MtG. I ...


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