62

Rule 707.9 says this: If a face-down permanent moves from the battlefield to any other zone, its owner must reveal it to all players as they move it. If a face-down spell moves from the stack to any zone other than the battlefield, its owner must reveal it to all players as they move it. If a player leaves the game, all face-down permanents and spells ...


43

No, Bob's behavior here should not be punished. The Magic Tournament Rules have the following definition for Slow Play: Players must take their turns in a timely fashion regardless of the complexity of the play situation and adhere to time limits specified for the tournament. Players must maintain a pace to allow the match to be finished in the announced ...


43

In general, your opponent cannot conclusively verify that your deck is legal. As you mention, you can always concede to prevent them from seeing certain cards. However, this statement that you made in your question is incorrect: since one can never prove that I'm cheating, one can't call a judge either Players can call a judge for any number of reasons, ...


29

Failing to reveal a face down creature with Morph at the end of the game is treated as a Game Loss. Per the MTG Infraction Procedure Guide: 3.2. Game Play Error — Hidden Card Error Penalty Warning Definition A player commits an error in the game that cannot be corrected by only publicly available information. It is not a Hidden Card Error if the opponent ...


25

It's not punishable. A judge may make sure Bob isn't taking too long to play (for example he really has nothing to think about each turn so should not be spending more than a few seconds to draw card, look at card, pass or play) each turn but it's Alice's choice to play a deck without a way to win quicker and if she can't win then that's her problem, not ...


21

The active player takes the rest of the turn as usual, then the five-turn count begins. This is based on my own experience, but it is likely that if they wanted to end the turn immediately they would have used a wording that matched the corresponding effect template and said "End the turn". Overall, it would not really make sense to end that turn like that. ...


16

The key phrase in that rule is in the first sentence: A player uses or offers to use a method that is not part of the current game (including actions not legal in the current game) to determine the outcome of a game or match. Importantly, it is not a violation of this rule to take an action that is legal in the current game to determine a winner. For ...


15

The attack was illegal. Your opponent can call a judge at any time, and is required to do so as soon as he noticed the error. The consequences of that error depend on the rules enforcement level (REL) and the judge's call. The illegal attack will be reverted, but you will not be allowed to animate and untap a different mountain at any REL. In the Tournament ...


12

The assumption is people are playing with legal decks - this is enforced at higher rules level events by random deck checks (where players are randomly selected and their decks compared to the decklist they submitted) and being able to call a judge when you find that your opponent's deck is not legal for whatever reason (including a 5th copy of a card) ...


12

First, players should never rewind game actions on their own; they should always call a judge to resolve problems like this. In the particular situation you describe, it is ambiguous whether any rule was actually broken. In this scenario, Tarmogoyf's power and toughness are derived information (see section 4.1 of the Magic Tournament Rules), and both ...


10

There was no illegal play, and no reason to rewind the game. From a rules perspective, the players did not notice "too late" that the attack would not be lethal, it was simply a misplay on Alice's part, as she could have independently verified the number of card types in Bob's graveyard. Assuming Bob did not intentionally give a wrong number (which would, ...


10

There is nothing in the CompRules about taking back legal actions, so when in doubt, ask the judge, unless you both want to risk a sanction in the worst case. He may nor may not allow it, and he may or may not require to be asked in the first place. In the end, a judge can give whatever ruling he wants, and the opposite of it on the next case. So there is no ...


10

Regarding shortcuts, the relevant rules for this scenario are: 716.1a The rules for taking shortcuts are largely unformalized. As long as each player in the game understands the intent of each other player, any shortcut system they use is acceptable. as well as 716.2a At any point in the game, the player with priority may suggest a shortcut by ...


9

Friday Night Magic runs at Regular REL, and is covered by Judging at Regular. The Tournament Rules and Infraction Procedure Guide cover Competitive and Professional REL. This answer borrows from all three documents and covers all three RELs. Should I call a judge? Absolutely. Am I required to call a judge? No. According to the Infraction Procedure Guide, ...


9

You should pretty much always call a judge when something weird like that happens. Don't think of this as starting a confrontation with the judge or with your opponent - judges are simply the experts in how to fix weird things, and in doing so such that both players will usually think they were treated fairly. That said, if you called the judge over, they ...


9

No, you are not allowed to do this because doing so would be a violation of tournament rules at every level. At Competitive and Professional REL, the Infraction Procedure Guide determines how judges handle rules violations. The action described in the question is a Game Rule Violation, a sort of catch-all category that includes making invalid attack or block ...


8

I would say that this is not in violation of any rules. By taking more turns than necessary, Alice is giving Bob additional chances to draw outs to this situation, so it is not unambiguously to Alice's advantage to draw this out. And Alice is drawing two cards per turn, so Alice only has 15 to 20 turns before she either decks out or plays Entreat and wins. ...


6

The infractions are the same for all REL. The difference lies in the penalties and remedies. Assuming it's clear the Declare Attackers step was step was entered (e.g. AP: "Declare Attackers?" NAP: "ok"), nothing in the rules allow the game to return to the Beginning of Combat step, so we're talking about Unsporting Conduct — Cheating (intentional breaking ...


6

There is nothing in the Magic Tournament Rules about timing when interrupting a shorcut. All it says is "A player may interrupt a tournament shortcut by explaining how he or she is deviating from it or at which point in the middle he or she wishes to take an action." So there is no reason you wouldn't be able to have a moment to think about it. Obviously if ...


4

The other answers to this question are very detailed calling on the comprehensive rules and are quite clear. I have had this problem in a tournament situation, and a judge was called to resolve the situation, Obviously this is anecdotal evidence but the judge was a level 2 and quite experienced running tournaments, so I would be surprised if their decision ...


4

Nothing/Warning for both you and your opponent at a Competitive REL or Regular REL event. The rules at Regular Rules Enforcement Level (REL) events (such as Friday Night Magic, Game Days, and Prereleases) has a more relaxed/friendly atmosphere, and does not use the Infraction Procedure Guide. The Infraction Procedure Guide has no Game Play Errors that match ...


2

Is there anything that disallows or allows or even requires markers to be used to indicate which of a group of facedown cards previously had a particular identity? A player must ensure at all times that their face-down spells and permanents can be easily differentiated from each other, but a physical marker is not necessarily required to do so. If just one ...


2

The Infraction Procedure Guide is the wrong document to refer to at FNM. FNMs are run at Regular REL, where players generally do not get penalized for gameplay errors. See the Judging at Regular REL document for the kinds of fixes (rather than penalties) that can get dispensed at FNM. In this case, after you notice 7 cards in what should be your hand of 6, ...


2

The answers to #1 and #2 will depend on the judge. A judge may not give a warning at all if it's unclear any rule has been violated. But if a judge does give a warning in this situation, it would probably be to you. The reason is that you are responsible for maintaining a clear and legal game state (both players are responsible for this, but yours are the ...


1

If one of the cards is summoning sick and the other not then being confused about which one to tap is rather trivial. If you tap both of them while one is sick then the rules are violated and then a judge really needs to be called. As for the rewinding of the turn, that really should only ever be done with the help of a judge. Also only actual rules ...


1

If the primary player has moved forward to the draw step, then the trigger was missed. If the secondary player is the one that drew a card, then that player has drawn extra cards. In either case, at regular REL, you should call a judge, explain what happened, and allow the judge to decide whether the trigger was missed or whether the game should be rolled ...


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