31

Yes, Player B still takes damage from the Goblin Fireslinger. Rule 112 covers this adequately. Rule 112.3a tells us that Activating an ability puts it on the stack, until it resolves, is countered (Stifle), or it otherwise leaves the stack (Time Stop). Rule 112.7a tells us that the activated ability exists independent of the source, and does not quality this ...


22

I am going to reiterate that the Basic Rules are sufficient for and a better way to learn how to play MtG rather than the Comprehensive Rules When can Instants be cast? Instants can be cast on your own turn, during your opponents turn, and in response to other spells. This differs from Sorcery cards, which can only be cast during your own Main Phase. (MtG ...


19

No, that won't work. If your opponent's creature has died, your opponent no longer controls it, and Huatli's ability will not see it. If your opponent wants to get the life for the creature that would die from the sweeper, he has to activate Huatli before casting the sweeper. Once your opponent has cast the sweeper (MtG slang for a spell or ability that ...


17

Would the stack resolve their ability first? Yes. A spell cast in response to another resolves first (Last In, First Out). 116.4. If all players pass in succession (that is, if all players pass without taking any actions in between passing), the spell or ability on top of the stack resolves or, if the stack is empty, the phase or step ends. would I be ...


16

The destruction only happens once, it's instantaneous, and there's only one creature vulnerable to it when it happens. 610.1. A one-shot effect does something just once and doesn’t have a duration. Examples include dealing damage, destroying a permanent, putting a token onto the battlefield, and moving an object from one zone to another. Think of it a ...


16

No, the turn continues as normal, without that player. 800.4i If a player leaves the game during their turn, that turn continues to its completion without an active player. If the active player would receive priority, instead the next player in turn order receives priority, or the top object on the stack resolves, or the phase or step ends, whichever is ...


16

Magic is designed to avoid any interruptions to the resolution of a spell or ability It might seem like placing triggers on the stack is a minor thing that would not cause any problems, but some triggers target and that means that now somebody is making decisions in the middle of the resolution of the spell. Even worse, some abilities trigger when the ...


15

I think it's instructive to go through both of your reasonings, since you're both partially right in a way but came to the wrong conclusion. the free spells get put on the stack before the original card resolves Your friend is actually right here. BUT — don't forget the rules of casting spells. In order to put a spell on the stack (even if free) he must ...


14

Basically, the answer to this question lies in the understanding of the phases of the turn. there are a number of phases and steps that a turn goes through, here is a brief overview: Untap step Upkeep Draw step First Main Phase Combat phase (has many sub steps, skipped for understanding) Second main phase End step Cleanup. The above is not an exhaustive ...


13

The ability still resolves. Once the costs of the ability are paid and targets are chosen, the ability goes on the stack. Once the ability is on the stack, the source of the ability can be destroyed, returned to hand, shuffled into a library, or exiled --- none of this affects the ability which is already on the stack. Additionally, because of the rules of ...


13

You have it correct, they will be allowed to draw cards. The specific order is: Opponent casts Faithless Looting... that casting process looks completely normal and doesn't interact with Narset at all. Aria of Flame's ability triggers, going on the stack on top of Faithless Looting Aria of Flame's ability resolves, dealing damage to Narset Narset goes to ...


12

Your opponent gets to put their silver on the stack first. However, you can then add your incinerate to the stack, targetting their Root Silver. Incinerate New Sliver You can then pass so the Incinerate resolves, destroying the Root Sliver. Stack is now: New Sliver Then you cast your counterspell so the stack is Counterspell New Sliver Your ...


12

You are correct, you can save your creatures with that play. The stack works according to the "last in, first out" principle. Whatever spell or ability goes on the stack becomes the top-most object on it, and when the stack starts resolving, the top-most object on the stack will resolve first. Whenever something resolves, players have the chance to play ...


11

In plain English: In most cases, players can only play sorceries, enchantments, creatures, artifacts, planeswalkers and lands on their turn. Instants and Abilities can be played on anyone's turn, as long as the ability does not say it is used as a sorcery. When a player plays a card by paying its cost, they then have the opportunity to play any instant or ...


11

You can reveal your hand and cards at will. It doesn't count as casting. 3.12 Hidden Information Hidden information refers to the faces of cards and other objects at which the rules of the game and format do not allow you to look. Throughout the match, a draft, and pregame procedures, players are responsible for keeping their cards above the level of the ...


11

The opponent can use either spell to target Hushwing Gryff while Eater of Days is on the stack. In this case, The spell resolves first, removing Hushwing Gryff from the battlefield. Eater of Days resolves, and as there is no Hushwing Gryff on the battlefield the caster of Eater of Days loses two turns.


10

Taken from this page: 700.4. If a permanent is indestructible, rules and effects can’t destroy it. (See rule 701.6, “Destroy.”) Such permanents are not destroyed by lethal damage, and they ignore the lethal-damage state-based action (see rule 704.5g). Rules or effects may cause an indestructible permanent to be sacrificed, put into a graveyard, or exiled. ...


10

If it's dead, it's not coming back. Reminder text isn't actually official rules, but it is there to help you out, and there's a key phrase in the reminder text to help you in this case just from the card, without having to look things up: You may cast this spell for its dash cost. If you do, it gains haste, and it's returned from the battlefield to its ...


10

Sinuous Striker will die without dealing combat damage. Your opponent's creature will remain blocked, but will not be destroyed. The problem with this combo is that there is no way to activate Sinuous Striker's ability without state-based actions being checked immediately afterwards. State-based actions are checked immediately after any ability resolves. ...


10

When you cast your creature, its triggered ability goes on the stack. At this point, all players have a chance to respond to the ability, before it resolves and taps the lands. They can respond by tapping the land for mana. The mana that is produced will go away at the end of the upkeep step, however, so they would have to use it then; they can’t keep it to ...


9

Your reasoning is only partly correct: you can't use that extra token to help pay for the spell, because it won't exist yet. You have to sacrifice two creatures that you already have at casting time. If you want extra creatures and tokens to sacrifice, they have to be there first. That's because of the spell casting process. During that process, nothing ...


9

Yes, you can remove a card discarded through Madness from exile before your opponent has a chance to cast it. As per the the relevant rule you already quoted, Madness has two parts to it. 702.34a Madness is a keyword that represents two abilities. The first is a static ability that functions while the card with madness is in a player’s hand. The second ...


9

Pull from Eternity will be useless. Those cards will be put into your library again immediately after you finish casting the spell, before it resolves. This means you could choose one of those exiled cards for a target of Pull from Eternity as it's cast via Cascade, but the exiled card will have left exile when Pull from Eternity resolves. That makes it an ...


9

This is incorrect; the damage will be dealt too late for Bloodthirst. You were right up to a point... but Warstorm Surge triggers on a creature entering the battlefield, meaning that it will not trigger until after Vampire Nighthawk is on the battlefield, completely done resolving. Note that Bloodthirst creates a replacement effect, that changes how a ...


9

The Griffin Protector will not get the bonus power and toughness from its ability until after it deals its damage. All combat damage is dealt simultaneously (ignoring First Strike and Double Strike). So, in this situation, first the Earl of Squirrel and the Griffin Protector both simultaneously deal their combat damage, and the Earl of Squirrel immediately ...


9

You would have to draw the 3 cards from Standstill and lose the game. Standstill has a triggered ability. It triggers whenever its trigger condition is met, i.e. whenever a player plays a spell. It can keep triggering as long as it's on the battlefield. 603.2. Whenever a game event or game state matches a triggered ability’s trigger event, that ability ...


9

Your conclusion is correct: no counters will be placed, and the creature's controller will not get any lands. Strictly speaking, each Ordeal's first triggered ability does not "fizzle". They still resolve as always, but the actions they try to take are impossible so they don't actually do anything. The creature is dead, so no counters can be placed ...


8

Given the situation you described (2 Slaughter Pacts and 15 lands in hand, and a Lightning Storm on the stack), you can definitely win. I assume that you started by targeting your opponent with Lightning Storm. Then you still have priority, so you cast Slaughter Pact targeting the Spellskite. You also discard 7 lands to Lightning Storm's ability (failing to ...


8

If you wait for your opponent to respond and your opponent has no response, your lightning bolt resolves before you can twincast it. 608.1. Each time all players pass in succession, the spell or ability on top of the stack resolves. (See rule 609, “Effects.”) You'll only get a chance to copy the bolt if they respond, or if you cast both spells before ...


8

Yes, you could have made your creatures all indestructible this way. What you did was a clever play that could've sealed your victory in this game. The notion your opponent expressed is nonsense: it doesn't matter whether Selfless Spirit was there at the time already. First, to get your head around how the stack works, please read this plain explanation ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible