11

There is a benefit to a villager holding back information, or telling a lie. The benefit is that if all the villagers immediately and automatically tell the truth, then the werewolf can use the information to his advantage. For example, if no villager claims to be the Seer, then the werewolf can safely say that he was the seer. If, however, people are ...


7

I'll ignore One Night Werewolf for now and focus on Avalon and more typical mafia games. To begin with, something that you may be overthinking: Not everyone is expected to bluff or lie. For the basic villager or knight, there's no harm in being wholly open and honest. You want people to believe you are a villager which is true. You aren't privy to any ...


7

It is very wrong. The rules are clear that you act whatever you had, you are whatever you have: After the night phase, your role is the card that is currently in front of you, which may be different than your original role. with emphasis added


6

You are the role/side of the card that you end up with at the end of the game once it is revealed. I have listed the rules for the robber as an example. In your example if you are able to discover your card is now a villager because of information gained from other players you would want to sell out a werewolf so they get killed and the villagers win ...


5

I will take the other answers a step further and say that talking during the Night phase is simply not allowed. The other answers give good reasons why it could be an issue, but here's what the rulebook says: At night, players who are not active (whose eyes are closed) may not move, point, or do anything to communicate with the active player(s). Any ...


4

The rules for the Defenderer: The rules for the role are that the Defenderer protects whoever they point to except in the case where the Defenderer herself has the most votes in which case the person she is pointing to is instead caught. The situation: The Defenderer pointed to another player, let's call him Player 1. Player 1 received the most votes. The ...


4

All play. You don't need a master: the players can all call the time/sequence (with their heads down and eyes closed) as needed. If you have a spare "player" who wants to moderate, that's fine, too, of course.


4

Werewolf is not playable by two, as you say. But if you want modern boardgames for two with a small footprint and a guessing mechanism there are many. For example: The Mind Mr. Jack Pocket Saboteur: The Duel. Codenames Duet Sherlock Holmes Consulting Detective (larger footprint)


3

Other than the Dream Wolf, all wolves wake up at the start of the Night phase. That's what makes the Dream Wolf special. The Daybreak rules, in describing the roles, make this clear: Alpha Wolf: At night, the Alpha Wolf wakes with the other Werewolves. Afterwards, the Alpha Wolf wakes up separately. Mystic Wolf: The Mystic Wolf wakes with the other ...


3

For voting, it matters who has the hunter when voting, not who started with it. What you started with only matters for what you do during the night phase. Similar with the Tanner and the Werewolves. For the doppelgänger, you just have to trust them. You always have to trust them to tell the truth about what they copied, no matter what it is.


3

The player that that the hunter pointed to would die because the bodyguards ability only protects from death from votes. Rules When everyone votes, the player that the bodyguard points to cannot be killed. If that player received the most votes, the player with the next most votes )at least two) is killed. What would happen is. Player 1 gets the most ...


2

We run into the same issues; generally playing with 7-8 people. There are a few techniques we use to help: Players don't keep their own cards immediately in front of them; they keep somewhere in between their own seat and the center of the table. Close enough that it's clear whose is whose. I try to start the night phase already leaning forward, so that if ...


2

The bluffing/lying stems from the major premise of most of these games: an uninformed majority against an informed minority. If everyone knew the teams, the majority would just win every vote (and every game). So the minority needs to lie, blend in, etc.


2

It will largely depend on the regular dynamics of your group, but in general, this is an annoying thing to do. Talking confuses people about which role is doing what and when, covers up either the announcement of your moderator (be it human or electronic) and distracts everybody from the actions they are taking. Commenting about what can or can't be heard ...


2

The Daybreak rules state the following for the P.I. (emphasis added): If the P.I. sees the Doppelgänger that saw a Werewolf, he continues looking (he doesn't know what the Doppelgänger saw, and does not become what the Doppelgänger saw, even if the Doppelgänger saw a Werewolf or Tanner). The Paranormal Investigator is on the village team, unless he finds a ...


1

You might like Love Letter - it has some similar mechanics, and is for 2-4 players.


1

Part 1: Is talking allowed during the night phase? Whether or not to allow talking during the night phase is going to be up to your group. A bunch of people sitting around with their eyes closed is an odd situation, and the natural inclination of humans in that situation is to chat or make jokes to break the tension, so in general it's not a problem. It ...


1

Use a referee for large games. Then you can just point at the cards and the referee (standing) can move around the room a lot and reach in to the table without actually showing anything during the phases so that people don't know which cards were shown or to whom.


1

I have played one night werewolf with 10 people on many occasions. Here the three things we have done that made it work well. Note that tips 1 and 2 are useful even at lower player numbers. Have everyone stand before the night phase. If you are playing on the floor, have everyone get up on their knees. This way, players can reach all of the cards ...


1

Note that one does not need to use a ten-seater table to play ONUW with ten people. There is only need for enough space to fit the centre board plus the cards of each player in a ring. A table or desk with dimensions of a metre each way is more than sufficient. The players' seats are pushed out away from the table when conducting the night phase. Each ...


1

There are two ways I can see going about this. Change the order players go in to be based on seating order (this is how one night resistance works) so that everyone goes in a set order. Also as part of this have everyone get up and walk around the table that way you can't tell what someone does based on getting up or not. When doing the night phase have ...


1

It is generally to the villagers advantage to be honest, as between their collective information, they can usually pinpoint the werewolves. The werewolves have three typical strategies to combat this: Camouflage as a villager. Have a story that is innocuous or actually backs up someone's story. For example: a villager claims to be the robber. Then you (...


1

In addition to the answer above: Yes, the way to figure out what exactly happened is to openly discuss what each played did during the night. But as the players share their information, this could lead to one of the players finding out they were the werewolf. Him openly sharing their information would then have led to a loss, because he helped the others ...


1

Allegiance moves with the card, so it's always the person with the PI card who will be a Werewolf. This isn't really spelled out with the PI card, but it follows the same process as the Doppelganger from the base game of ONUW (the PI being from the Daybreak expansion). If a player receives the Doppelganger card during the night, she is the role the ...


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