Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
20

First of all, I want to insist that my answer is not 'dogmatic'. It is rather the way I like to think and rather a guideline instead of a deterministic answer. $$ --------------------------------------- $$|. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .| $$|. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .| $$|. . . O X . . . . . . . . . . . . . .| $$|. . O X . . . . . , . . . . ...


12

A good question to ask yourself here: does everyone in my playgroup have the same distaste for blue cards that I feel? If so, if they're predisposed to ignore them in favour of "cooler" cards, you could easily make a killing by snapping them up. I will agree that something like the Pawnshop (3 victory points, that's it), doesn't seem like an exciting card, ...


11

It seems that the move to play for White is an extension on the upper side or in the lower side. Clearly, the lower side is more interesting for the following two main reasons. $$W $$ --------------------------------------- $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . O . . . . . . 1 . . . . X . . . . | $...


9

Castling is still done in "modern" openings, but it doesn't quite have the urgency that it used to. "In the old days" (until about 30-40 years ago), the accepted practice was to develop as quickly as possible, castle (usually kingside), and then start an attack against the enemy king. "Nice" for White (who gets the first move), not so great for Black. ...


8

I don't have a database at my disposal so I can't provide hard numbers over time to confirm this, but I believe one of the reasons high point openings saw emerging popularity was that white was attempting to play quickly in order to overcome the lack of komi. There was also the "threat" of playing extremely complicated joseki such as the taisha, which would ...


8

I agree that it is pretty rare for taking these to be right, although I have to say I would usually prefer taking one to taking 3 bucks unless I know I will have money issues. There are a few circumstances, however, when it makes some sense. If you start with a rock resource because of your wonder, or happen to have built a rock resource, and are not ...


8

On e4 the White pawn is strong, controlling the important central square d5 (which Black has given up some control over by playing c5). You might think that it is just as good to control d6, but d6 is less central. The loss of time is also significant. You spend a move to put the pawn on e5, and then another move to defend it with the queen. You will have ...


8

I think this is a pretty suspect line for White. Consider this advice from Ludec Pachman, in his book Modern Chess Strategy. He gives four general principles to guide beginners in the opening. Place the pieces without loss of time where they can develop their greatest power. Do not move a piece that is already developed unless there is a strong reason for ...


8

Key assumption: Every player places both of their initial settlements according to what will get them the most resources (so we don't have people going for port combos, weird 12/2 superstitions, etc.) I just downloaded the rules and have the Beginner's Setup in front of me. If you don't, then this won't make any sense! We all agree that it suffices to add ...


7

Controlling the Center: 1) From the beginning of the game until the King castles, the center of the board is where the King is, and so it is the logical place to begin operations. After the King does castle, the operations tend to focus on creating an attack on the flank where the King has moved to. 2) The middle of the board allows for the most mobility ...


5

Looking through my database (about 71,000+ games), it becomes clear that the high openings have always had a smaller than usual incidence than the 3-4 and later the 4-4. However, it never really fell out of use by professionals. If you are thinking about amateur play, that could be possible. I have no data on amateur games in my database. I think that it ...


5

Generally, the standard accepted openings in regular chess are the same that apply to blitz chess. Gambit openings are more risky in blitz, as they generally involve long-term gain resulting from short-term disadvantages. Unless you are very comfortable in a gambit opening that returns significant results fairly early, I would generally avoid them. Some ...


5

The DISADVANTAGE is that your pawn is on e5, without the support of one on either d4 or f4, meaning that the pawn has to be protected by pieces, one of which happens to be your queen. If you are not careful, your queen could be "developed" prematurely. And it does block your light squared bishop for the time being. That said, there are some potential ...


4

The opening you use is different if you are referring to playing a 4-player game, or a 2-player game (not duo, but the 2-player version on the full board). I don't have much to say about the 4-player game, but if you're playing the classic-2 player version (C2), then this Barasona opening is actually very weak. In a 2-player game, you should try to get ...


4

I think that purchasing a transport in the Mediterranean with Germany is justified only if Russia's opening attack(s) went poorly. We are discussing the 'Classic Edition' of Axis and Allies as opposed to the newer Spring of 1942 edition, correct? If so, I often load up two infantry onto the starting Mediterranean transport and move it and the battleship to ...


4

I play a lot of dopplekopf (aka double sheepshead although there are more differences than just the deck size). A bare fail-suit (non-trump) Ace has a reasonable chance of taking a trick and certainly helps your team. The odds that your partner(s) had a better legal play had they known you were on their team are small, so this seems like a good lead. If ...


4

Look at this question and its answers for Joseki databases on the net. Black has a lot of possibilities here, including tenuki. None of your marked moves is really bad, but C is the least favourable of them. I'd just play tenuki and take the last open corner. Even with a double approach, the two space approach leaves a lot of room to escape or to create a ...


4

There are a lot of possibilities for this opening. If you want the bottom space, you could take pincer move(around D) to cooperate with your corner D4; You also could take A to strengthen corner space and threaten to White(this move might better then B due to more threat on White); Take the open up-right corner also OK(corner is more valuable then side); C ...


3

Assumptions: You're playing 5 player sheepshead. You are leading and the picker. (Seemed implied) Your hand isn't super-strong. Let's start with the "Lead a singleton fail Ace" ploy. As we know, there are 6 cards of fail. In order to have a singleton fail Ace, either the player was singleton before burying, or the player buried other fail in the suit. In ...


3

Obviously the french defense is not a cramped defense (or else Mihail Botvinnik would not have been a world champion). The french defense is one of the most solid defenses. About the black squared bishop it is a great piece for black in many cases, a great piece as black's pawns are in white squares with great movility from the start. The white squared ...


3

What I have had success with is sending both subs with 3 fighters to the North Sea and 2 fighters and bomber to wipe England's battleship in Gibraltar. This allows the two transports and battleship to hook up in Spain's sea zone and put pressure on atlantic. The English have to decide to send in their transport and all the airforce to sink the German ...


3

This is NOT a King's Indian Attack, because d4 has been played. In the KIA, white plays d3 and e4, not d4. The classification of an opening requires moves from both sides, not just white. For example: This position, which arises after 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.g3 b5 4.Bg2 Bb7 is sometimes called the Romanishin System. But it is only a Romanishin System if ...


3

While I wouldn't call myself an expert, I have played a lot, and here are some of my thoughts on the matter. Classic is the most simple of the three, and does not lend itself to defence, both players are rather open. For this reason, classic games tend to be short when the players know what they are doing. Dynasty is my personal favorite. The defences of ...


3

Opening memorization is not important at all, especially to casual play, and shouldn't be the focus of study time for serious players, either, even up to around expert/master level. For casual play, you should instead follow basic opening principles: put a pawn or two in the center, move all your pieces once before moving any piece twice (unless there's a ...


3

The King's Indian is a hypermodern opening, where Black deliberately allows White control of the centre with his pawns, with the view to subsequently challenging it with the moves ...e5 or ...c5. The Queen's Indian Defense, also a hypermodern opening, is defined by the moves 1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 e6 3. Nf3 b6 The move 3...b6 increases Black's control over the ...


3

I am not an expert at 960 Chess, but the same basic rules apply: develop your pieces, take control of the center, and bring your king to safety as quickly as possible.


3

On http://gameknot.com/chess-games-database.pl there are 23 games with this opening, 39% white wins, 56% black, and 4% draws, but this is a pretty weak database so I wouldn't go on that too strongly. If someone has a chessbase account maybe they can get better stats. It seems like the best continuations for black are: 4 ...d6 After this move the only real ...


3

it is also easier to go for the longest road when you start in fourth or third. keep that in mind. To me, it all depends on the board : like if there is one supreme location and players takes it... but that's kind of rare. There are usually 4 honestly good places and then it gets worse, so the advantage of being first is not that good to me.


3

Territory is more important on a 13X13 board than on a 19x19 board, because it's smaller. Therefore, a given chunk of territory is more valuable. That is because the corner josekis give a "fixed" amount of territory, while the resulting outer walls are worth less (and overlap more) on the 13 x13 board. So you should play a "lower" (near the edge) more ...


3

In Standard American bidding (and 2/1 game forcing for that matter), after partner's 1H opening, 1S promises at least 4 spades. After 1H-1S, partner's mostly likely calls are 1NT (5332 shape with no more than 14 HCP), 2 of a minor (5-4 or better in the bid suits, may have anything short of a game force in terms of values), 2H (6+ hearts, probably less than ...


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