20

First of all, I want to insist that my answer is not 'dogmatic'. It is rather the way I like to think and rather a guideline instead of a deterministic answer. $$ --------------------------------------- $$|. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .| $$|. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .| $$|. . . O X . . . . . . . . . . . . . .| $$|. . O X . . . . . , . . . . ...


12

That appears to be the Scholar's Mate, the four-move game that ends with 4. Qxf7#. In chess, Scholar's Mate is the checkmate achieved by the moves 1. e4 e5 2. Qh5 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6? 4. Qxf7#. The moves might be played in a different order or in slight variation, but the basic idea is the same – the queen and bishop combine in a simple mating attack on f7 (or ...


12

A good question to ask yourself here: does everyone in my playgroup have the same distaste for blue cards that I feel? If so, if they're predisposed to ignore them in favour of "cooler" cards, you could easily make a killing by snapping them up. I will agree that something like the Pawnshop (3 victory points, that's it), doesn't seem like an exciting card, ...


11

This site suggests third-from-the-left (your 4) followed by far-right (your 1). This opening has the following strengths: It empties bin F* early in the game, allowing Mi to play a single pebble from F into her mancala each time a single pebble lands there. It empties bin F at a time when at least two of the pebbles from F (those landing in J ...


11

It seems that the move to play for White is an extension on the upper side or in the lower side. Clearly, the lower side is more interesting for the following two main reasons. $$W $$ --------------------------------------- $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . O . . . . . . 1 . . . . X . . . . | $...


10

"Cramped" openings are generally used by players who are good at piling up strong defenses for the opening and who hope to encourage overextension on White's part, in order to take advantage of it; or to fend it off till it has passed, and then muster an attack of their own. After 1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5, which is the common continuation of the French Defense, ...


9

These would be classified as A00: Irregular Openings. Starting with 1. a4 is Ware's Opening; 1. b4 is Sokolsky's Opening; 1. g4 is Grob's Attack; 1. h4 is the Desprez Opening. As you've noted, these are not played often. The database at chessgames.com shows only 548 games starting with 1. b4, 260 with 1. g4, and just 10 each for 1. a4 and 1. h4. White has ...


9

It hasn't been ignored; this is called the Ruy Lopez Exchange variation, and is extremely popular in tournament play. 5. Nxe5 is considered a small mistake (for the reasons you mentioned), but moves like 5. O-O and 5. Nc3 are perfectly acceptable, and are played by grandmasters all the time.


9

This is called the "Exchange" Variation of the Ruy Lopez. Not only is there an early exchange of bishop for knight, but it usually soon leads to an exchange of queens on d4. This queen exchange brings about an early "endgame," effectively cutting out the middle game. Most players are not particularly fond of the endgame, so they don't consider this an ...


9

Castling is still done in "modern" openings, but it doesn't quite have the urgency that it used to. "In the old days" (until about 30-40 years ago), the accepted practice was to develop as quickly as possible, castle (usually kingside), and then start an attack against the enemy king. "Nice" for White (who gets the first move), not so great for Black. ...


8

I agree that it is pretty rare for taking these to be right, although I have to say I would usually prefer taking one to taking 3 bucks unless I know I will have money issues. There are a few circumstances, however, when it makes some sense. If you start with a rock resource because of your wonder, or happen to have built a rock resource, and are not ...


8

I don't have a database at my disposal so I can't provide hard numbers over time to confirm this, but I believe one of the reasons high point openings saw emerging popularity was that white was attempting to play quickly in order to overcome the lack of komi. There was also the "threat" of playing extremely complicated joseki such as the taisha, which would ...


8

On e4 the White pawn is strong, controlling the important central square d5 (which Black has given up some control over by playing c5). You might think that it is just as good to control d6, but d6 is less central. The loss of time is also significant. You spend a move to put the pawn on e5, and then another move to defend it with the queen. You will have ...


8

I think this is a pretty suspect line for White. Consider this advice from Ludec Pachman, in his book Modern Chess Strategy. He gives four general principles to guide beginners in the opening. Place the pieces without loss of time where they can develop their greatest power. Do not move a piece that is already developed unless there is a strong reason for ...


8

Key assumption: Every player places both of their initial settlements according to what will get them the most resources (so we don't have people going for port combos, weird 12/2 superstitions, etc.) I just downloaded the rules and have the Beginner's Setup in front of me. If you don't, then this won't make any sense! We all agree that it suffices to add ...


7

Controlling the Center: 1) From the beginning of the game until the King castles, the center of the board is where the King is, and so it is the logical place to begin operations. After the King does castle, the operations tend to focus on creating an attack on the flank where the King has moved to. 2) The middle of the board allows for the most mobility ...


7

Yes, here's a link that talks about an example, The Switcher. And here's a great link that lists them all.


7

Really, the most important thing is to have the ability to deal with monsters that are in the way without having significant delays. Whether that is being able to effectively sneak past things or just kill them outright. If you're trying to jump around to locations to pick up clues to seal, you want to make sure you can get to locations and not have (...


5

These openings are considered "irregular," and therefore not totally reputable. There are two reasons. The first reason is that unlike c4, d4, e4, and f4, they do not begin a fight for the key center squares. You can make the case that b4 and g4 open the way for a bishop to be "fianchettoed," but they get the player "involved" in other ways. B3 and g3 are "...


5

Looking through my database (about 71,000+ games), it becomes clear that the high openings have always had a smaller than usual incidence than the 3-4 and later the 4-4. However, it never really fell out of use by professionals. If you are thinking about amateur play, that could be possible. I have no data on amateur games in my database. I think that it ...


5

Generally, the standard accepted openings in regular chess are the same that apply to blitz chess. Gambit openings are more risky in blitz, as they generally involve long-term gain resulting from short-term disadvantages. Unless you are very comfortable in a gambit opening that returns significant results fairly early, I would generally avoid them. Some ...


5

The DISADVANTAGE is that your pawn is on e5, without the support of one on either d4 or f4, meaning that the pawn has to be protected by pieces, one of which happens to be your queen. If you are not careful, your queen could be "developed" prematurely. And it does block your light squared bishop for the time being. That said, there are some potential ...


4

Germany has a small window in which it can afford to bolster its navy. Presuming the Russians are building a suitable wall in Karelia and the US and UK are planning to shuck-shuck, Germany needs every IPC later in the game to build infantry and armor and cannot afford to build a transport, sub, or (gasp) air craft carrier or battleship. For that reason, ...


4

The opening you use is different if you are referring to playing a 4-player game, or a 2-player game (not duo, but the 2-player version on the full board). I don't have much to say about the 4-player game, but if you're playing the classic-2 player version (C2), then this Barasona opening is actually very weak. In a 2-player game, you should try to get ...


4

I've actually had 1. b4 played against me in tournaments; it's awkward, but not unsound like 1. a4 or 1. h4 - the idea is to fianchetto the bishop to b2 as fast as possible, even if it means sacrificing the pawn. Personally, however, I don't believe the pawn-sacrifice is worth the extra space white gains vs. playing the alternative, 1. b3. 1. g4 is also ...


4

I think that purchasing a transport in the Mediterranean with Germany is justified only if Russia's opening attack(s) went poorly. We are discussing the 'Classic Edition' of Axis and Allies as opposed to the newer Spring of 1942 edition, correct? If so, I often load up two infantry onto the starting Mediterranean transport and move it and the battleship to ...


4

I play a lot of dopplekopf (aka double sheepshead although there are more differences than just the deck size). A bare fail-suit (non-trump) Ace has a reasonable chance of taking a trick and certainly helps your team. The odds that your partner(s) had a better legal play had they known you were on their team are small, so this seems like a good lead. If ...


4

Look at this question and its answers for Joseki databases on the net. Black has a lot of possibilities here, including tenuki. None of your marked moves is really bad, but C is the least favourable of them. I'd just play tenuki and take the last open corner. Even with a double approach, the two space approach leaves a lot of room to escape or to create a ...


4

There are a lot of possibilities for this opening. If you want the bottom space, you could take pincer move(around D) to cooperate with your corner D4; You also could take A to strengthen corner space and threaten to White(this move might better then B due to more threat on White); Take the open up-right corner also OK(corner is more valuable then side); C ...


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