7

It's entirely a question of efficiency: It simply takes fewer stones to secure more territory if you play in the corner. Taking, for example, the eleven stones White plays in your sample game, if Black had played the same number of stones in the corner instead: $$Bc $$ ----------------------------------------- $$ - x X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - $$ -...


5

It is a question of efficiency. In this diagram, white has indeed made a live group, taking 11 moves to surround 4 points of territory. The black stones 3 and 5 make a loose but significant claim to 30 points or more. If black had been making similar moves with the other nine plays while what was building its little fortress, it would have a much more ...


5

There are a lot of possibilities for this opening. If you want the bottom space, you could take pincer move(around D) to cooperate with your corner D4; You also could take A to strengthen corner space and threaten to White(this move might better then B due to more threat on White); Take the open up-right corner also OK(corner is more valuable then side); C ...


5

Look at this question and its answers for Joseki databases on the net. Black has a lot of possibilities here, including tenuki. None of your marked moves is really bad, but C is the least favourable of them. I'd just play tenuki and take the last open corner. Even with a double approach, the two space approach leaves a lot of room to escape or to create a ...


4

My groups have enjoyed having players always have two terrains from which to choose. When you play one draw to replace it.


3

There are plenty of systems that open on 4-cards, I myself play one, and that is not very uncommon here. 4-card systems are commonly used to teach Bridge. Most people prefer 5-card major though, and 4-card major feels outdated these days. A couple of the more well-known 4-card systems are ACOL Standard American, originnal


3

Although I wouldn't call it a "significant study" as far as initial placement strategies, there is a blog that I found a while ago which gets into an analysis of playing (and winning) SoC from a mathematical perspective. The blog is called "Developing Catan", and includes the application of several types of mathematical analysis to the game based on the ...


3

In Standard American bidding (and 2/1 game forcing for that matter), after partner's 1H opening, 1S promises at least 4 spades. After 1H-1S, partner's mostly likely calls are 1NT (5332 shape with no more than 14 HCP), 2 of a minor (5-4 or better in the bid suits, may have anything short of a game force in terms of values), 2H (6+ hearts, probably less than ...


3

This is NOT a King's Indian Attack, because d4 has been played. In the KIA, white plays d3 and e4, not d4. The classification of an opening requires moves from both sides, not just white. For example: This position, which arises after 1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 e6 3.g3 b5 4.Bg2 Bb7 is sometimes called the Romanishin System. But it is only a Romanishin System if ...


2

You need only four spades to respond one spade. When your partner opens, you are expected to try to keep the bidding open if possible. That's why you need only four of a major to respond, and as little six points (although you may have a lot more). The fact that you have four spades is valuable information. Your bid (in a new suit) is forcing, meaning that ...


2

In addition to any of the other variations mentioned, one of the variations we have used to speed up games is to provide each player a number of "trade tokens." We keep this low as we don't want to diminish the value of having ports, so typically 1-3. These trade tokens can be used to trade two resources (same type) for any one resource. When the token is ...


2

It's not professional games but they are between very strong players: http://dcook.org/compgo/9by9_experiments.html This has tons of games: http://gobase.org/9x9/


2

This is what I would do if I wanted to avoid this: At the start of the game, remove one card of each terrain type, shuffle and give each person a card. Shuffle the remaining cards back into the deck. This will guarantee everyone has a unique starting terrain.


2

W1 should be N11, then black dies, I'd claim from memory. W1 at R13 is probably not a complete disaster in itself, but O12 should then be O11, or maybe P10 should be O10. That would force black to capture and white would at least build some influence -- not thickness, as she can't protect all cuts. Even before that, white should probably descend at T13 and ...


2

Your big mistake was your slack move at 12. It's a bit scary to have Black make two shimaris. The reason he shouldn't have done this is that his two stones in the bottom left corner were left stranded. You should have played 12 one or two points to the left of 13, and chased these stones. This would have given you an initiative that would have more than ...


1

The answers by goldPseudo and David Siegel say most of it. I should just like to add these positions, namely three groups which can be expected to live unless White gets in a lot of moves very close around them before Black answers: $$Bc $$ ----------------------------------------- $$ - a a . . . . . . . . b b . . . . . . . - $$ - a a . . . . . . . . b b . . ...


1

Just a few things to note here: The vast majority of the moves, black and white, are played on the third line; this emphasises territory over influence. As far as third-line territory is concerned, you're both fairly equal. Black starts to break into the fourth line early with E4; this is a common joseki move which serves to strengthen black's group while ...


1

Found a nice answer in a Reddit thread by byu/DiscreteMelody Many of these leading conventions are borrowed from Bridge, and for great reason - they work. Even though half of the cards are known in Bridge, we can still convey a great deal of information to partner on our leads. The following leading conventions are commonly used when the aim is to maximize ...


1

I have done some research on it on various game boards, and most experienced players recommend not to take Storm's End, and offering to leave it to Martells on the condition that they don't muster units there. After a moment of thinking, I think it's about right. Storm's End is, after all, just one regular castle. But it basically confines Martells to ...


1

I've found a particularly effective 3 move opening in Blokus is to play two of the most linear pieces first, head straight for the center of the board, then on your third move play the big cross piece as near to the center of the board as you can. Then radiate out in all directions. Using this tactic ive observed that by the end of most games i dont ...


1

The most important part of senji from my experience was the ability to attack. Unlike a normal area of control game where the primary purpose of troops is to conquer territories, in Senji the primary purpose of soldiers from a time perspective is to die in combat thus gaining you honor. While holding territories does give you more actions each turn, it ...


1

Highly aggressive openings and gambits in which a pawn is given up for the initiative or piece activity can be very effective in blitz. This is because, in general (and especially at lower levels), attacking and creating threats is easier than defending, and defending with limited time on the clock is even more difficult. You will often see grandmasters ...


1

As other answers have pointed it out, it really depends on what you're doing with the game, and what others are doing. For example - building brown and grey cards is a great strategy if your neighbors aren't, because then they'll buy them from you. If they are... then maybe you should consider just buying theirs. Reds are an easy eighteen points... so ...


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