6

In modern, Western usage, they are the same game Consider these two games: 1981 Pachisi by Whitman Games 1982 Parcheesi by Selchow & Righter (later republished by Milton Bradley) Both of these have similar boards with only cosmetic differences. They also both use dice, are played individually rather than in teams, and have similar rules. There are ...


5

If there is no specific rule that allows you to change the dice usage at the end of the game, then you must roll the dice as always. However, after reading the rules more carefully, rolling only one die would actually be a disadvantage. The dies are used separately, not necessarily added together to move. That is, if you are 3 spaces away (a move less than 7 ...


3

They get bumped. Covered in the rules: A piece may not be placed on a safe space (generally colored light blue) if it is occupied by an opponent's piece.1 The exception is the safe space used when a piece leaves its nest — a single piece occupying such a safe space is sent back to its nest when an opponent's piece leaves the nest and occupies the space.[3] ...


3

Proposed answer : A new blockade cannot be formed Parcheesi is the trademarked name of the American version of the Indian game Pachisi. Milton-Bradley and Parker Brothers sold the game under this name and were acquired by Hasbro. The Parker Brothers rules do not address the problem presented here. Parker Brothers Parcheesi Rules The Milton-Bradley rules ...


2

The Parker Brothers rules, which are available on Hasbro's website, are silent on the subject. https://www.hasbro.com/common/instruct/Parchessi.PDF The Milton Bradley rules explicitly state that you may use either the 2 or the 6, your choice. https://www.fgbradleys.com/rules/Parcheesi.pdf All other sources of rules copy these or, as in the Wikipedia entry, ...


2

No. Each die is used in toto of itself. You cannot re-combine the pips in other combinations. As for the special case of entering, the rules are clear on this. Pieces may only leave the nest with a roll of a five on a single die or the sum of the dice. A double five can be used to move two pieces from the nest simultaneously.


1

Depends on which rules you're using. If you're playing with these Parker Brothers rules, you only get another turn if you used all of the double roll. If you can't use all of the roll, you don't get an extra turn. Doubles If a player throws doubles he has another turn and continues to have another turn as long as he throws doubles, excepting that if he ...


1

If you can only use the lower number, you are free to do so (and indeed must do so). Note the "citation needed" on that one rule you're quoting on wiki. Likely the source for that includes clearer text to the handling of the rule. It means if it is possible to use either of the dice but not both, then the player must use the higher number. It ...


1

Yes (in most rules; check your specific rules for exceptions). From Wiki Pieces may only be moved to the home position with an exact application of the total roll, the value on a single die, or the complete application of a reward. You cannot voluntarily forfeit a roll, but you can take part of the roll if that is your only option. All die rolls must be ...


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