4

There may be other ways to think about this, but for me these are the reasons to play trump during the melding phase: If you need to start the game with the lead. If you have a lone Ace or if you have cards in every suit you don't want the other person to start the play because you will lose cards that would otherwise take tricks or may not get into the ...


4

Depending on the probability being asked for, this is somewhere between one in a million, and one in six hundred hands. Pinochle has a deck with 48 cards, consisting of two each of six ranks (A, T, K, Q, J, 9) in four suits. The deck is dealt exhaustively between the four players, so each is dealt a hand of twelve cards. A double run consists of ten ...


3

According to pagat.com's John McLeod, quite a well researched card aficionado, there were four steps in the evolution of Pinochle scoring. http://www.powerpinochle.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=877&pid=3074#pid3074 Based on the individual "counter" points in the trick taking phase, A T K Q J were scored respectively: 11-10-4-3-2 (original quinary ...


3

The current 10 points for every Ace, 10 and King in the trick pile is a new way of scoring. The original scoring had different values for different cards so although the multiples of 10 aren't needed now they were before. According to http://www.playingcardsandmore.com/pinochleanoverview.aspx Original Card Values: Each Ace 11, Each Ten 10, Each King 4, ...


3

There are many different sets of rules for Pinochle, most are the same but almost every household I've played at has something 'different'. However, my understanding of the winner (in what ever variation being played) was the one who won the bid will be the winner regardless of the scores if both are winning scores. This is because it forces each bidder/...


3

TLDR: This will happen roughly once every 1.7 million hands. Rules Background Double-deck Pinochle is a four player game using a deck of 80 cards (four lots of ATKQJ in each of ♣♦♥♠) (cf. Wikipedia and this rules page). A double run is two sets ATKQJ in whichever suit is declared trumps. Trumps is decided by a bidding mechanism, but for this answer we'll ...


3

They get the full 150 for their run. A run is by definition an A, 10, K, Q, J of trump suit; which is what they had. It is not required to be the person who won the bid in order to have a run. From the rules: The values of the melds are: A,10, K, Q, J of trump suit (flush, or sequence) 150


2

TL;DR: The odds are 1 in 1,733,866 To compute: First calculate how many ways you can select a "winning hand": Winning configuration count for your choice of suit x: Each digit in the configuration represents either the number of aces of a suit, without regard to a specific suit or the number of TJQK in suit X, without regard to a specific rank: ...


2

I don't know of an "usual" way of calling players in that case, but wouldn't a clock analogy do the trick, here? You could have: 12 o'clock 2 o'clock 5 o'clock 7 o'clock 10 o'clock


1

Assuming double deck of 80 cards and four players, the number of ways you can get a double run and the player to your left can get a run in the same suit is: 4*(C(4,2)*C(2,1))^5*C(50,25) (4 for the choice of suits, Choose two of the aces for one hand and one for the second, raised to the fifth power to repeat that sort of selection for the 10, K, Q, and J, ...


1

A roundhouse normally doesn't have any special scoring involved; it is simply a nickname for a set of other things that score, that happen to add up to 24. In your case: Double Royal Marriage: 8 Queens around: 6 Kings around: 8 3 Marriages: 6 This adds up to 28 (which is 24 for the roundhouse, plus 4 for the extra royal marriage). Thus, by default rules, ...


1

You would have 6 points for the Queens, 4 points for the Jacks, and 30 points for the double pinochle, for a total of 40 points. This is really no different than the single pinochle case that you list; you just have 30 points instead of 4 for the pinochle points, so 26 more points than your first example.


1

Card games often use cardinal seat naming; probably for the intuitive/spatial advantage. When the number of players forces a decision to be made about how to name a seat using cardinal points, I'd like to offer a few principles that I have long considered and now adopted in my Pinochle Notation (viewable @ http://www.powerpinochle.com/forum/PN.php#Seat# ) ...


1

Bouncing on @rainbolt's answer, if spatial position is not important in the game you describe but you fear confusion by using A,B,C,D,E or 1,2,3,4,5, you could maybe also go with the Greek alphabet : alpha, beta, gamma, delta or epsilon (or the symbols if you think people are familiar enough with them)... An alternative I sometimes use when I need to ...


1

I don't think there are any usual terms. This is not as fancy as cardinal directions, but it is simple: One Two Three Four Five The beauty of this approach is that, like cardinal directions, as soon as you know one position, you can easily identify the remaining positions. Granted, you have to know whether the numbering is clockwise or counter-clockwise (...


1

The odds of a given player being dealt hands with those melds in them are roughly as follows: | MELD TYPE | NONE | SINGLE | DOUBLE | TRIPLE | QUAD | | Runs | 0.522113 | 0.476676 | 0.001211 | 0.000000 | 0.000000 | | Marriages | 0.055983 | 0.716652 | 0.221239 | 0.006113 | 0.000013 | | Pinochles | 0.528127 | 0.411803 | 0.058548 | 0....


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