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57

The first thing to mention is definitely that there are no extra cards. Poker hands are evaluated with exactly five cards. Sometimes you use all five community cards as your best hand, in which case your pocket is useless (bluffing aside, of course). So strike that right away: if you can't beat your opponent with five cards, you've lost (or tied). This is ...


25

Your opponent won the pot. The fact that there's a flush on the table isn't relevant to whether or not your pocket cards matter. Each player creates the best 5-card hand that he can out of the total 7 cards (2 pocket cards plus 5 table cards). While it is possible that the best 5-card hand is the 5 table cards, that is not the case here. The best 5-card ...


24

If a player cannot cover a blind, that player is all-in and the bets are handled just as if that player had gone all-in on an ordinary bet. The main pot gets an amount of money from each player who bets equal to the all-in player's stake. Any further betting goes into a side pot, which the all-in player is ineligible to win.


22

The deck linked by @Glorfindel is for French playing cards. Here's a link to poker playing cards, in PNG or SVG format. Poker cards are wider than French ones. This design is used by many decks, e.g. Bicycle Playing Cards, and will typically be the one you see in movies or at the casino. A full set of poker playing cards created using vector graphics. ...


19

Googling for 'SVG cards' gives some results, including this one which is also featured on Wikipedia. (created by David Bellot)


15

In Hold'em, each player makes the best possible 5-card hand possible using any of the 7 cards available. To each player, there is no distinction between the communal cards and their own private cards. The selected 5-card poker hand can include 0, 1, or 2 of the hole cards. It's possible that the best hand you can make uses 0 of your hole cards. In this case,...


14

First of all: in your examples 2 and 3, the 'extra cards' (Alice's king and Bob's jack in example 2, and Alice's 7 and Bob's 6 in example 3) effectively don't exist: for comparison purposes, you use precisely each player's best 5-card hand. Those hands are 45678 in example 2 and 33322 in example 3; any additional cards in the player's hands are entirely ...


13

There are a number of different hands that have a specific name. For example, A-2-3-4-5 is called a Wheel. The Royal Flush obviously gets its name from being the highest hand, and specifically having royalty in it (although one could argue so does a King high.) As for the mistake of ranking of Straight Flush being lower than 4 of a kind, this is easily ...


9

Player B is considered all in and Player C must still match the full blind amount and there will just be two possible winning piles depending on who wins. If Player B wins they would win 60 chips per player that paid the big blind and the next high hand would win the rest. pokerlistings.com When a player's stack is less than the amount of the small blind, ...


6

You are doing the math correctly. Start out with $100. Get 1% cash back, so essentially you have $101. Now, 99.54% RTP, gets you 0.9954 * 101 = $100.54 So, on average every $100 you play, you would make 54 cents. (It's far more likely that RTP is closer to 99%, in which case, the result is $99.99, but let's say it's really 99.54%) According to an article ...


6

In other words, do you choose how to play your hand in the end, or is the most valuable combination of cards automatically and involuntarily chosen? What a player claims to have, is irrelevant. The one and only thing that matters in deciding a player's hand is what cards that player may use. The one and only claim of a hand that matters is putting the cards ...


6

The higher flush wins the pot. And a Q-J-10-8-6 is better than a Q-J-8-7-6 so your opponent won the pot. It's the same for any other non-flush hand where the highest cards form the tie break. Then you compare the next one and the next until 5 cards are in both hands. Then if both 5 card hands are identical it's a tie. In this case, your 3rd best card ...


6

I think there is a misunderstanding that 'the line' is a fold line. I've played in many casinos where there is no line. Just because cards have crossed that line face up doesn't automatically make them dead. The most important bit here is was there a verbal statement 'all in'. If we look at Robert's Rules, which has been on display in most poker rooms I'...


5

The reason for the difference is tied to concept of blinds, which are simply mandatory initial bets to ensure there is some money at play for every hand. In regular rounds (of three or more players), the small blind (one seat to the left of the button/dealer) is effectively the first bet (the small blind amount) and the big blind (two seats to the left of ...


5

The general concept here is known as "pot odds". The basic goal is to figure out your probability of winning, and then compare the amount of money to "call" to the total amount of money you would win if you are successful. Neither of those are known values though, so you need to do your best to guess what they are. That requires both thinking about both ...


5

It's a hard question to answer, and depends on the player's style and whether the player likes to bluff, as well as the style and skill of the other players. If I don't have decent hole cards (low cards or nothing matching) I fold. I might risk it if I'm one of the blinds, but if I'm raised I'll fold. If I have a decent starting hand I usually wait for the ...


4

I can think of two reasons why someone would decide to add more chips: He thinks he has the best hand at the table (he wants to win a large pot). He thinks he can convince others that he has the best hand at the table (he wants the stakes to be too high for others to continue).


4

This is a form of collusion, and would not be permitted in many casinos or tournaments according to their rules. A home-game or less-reputable operation may make its own rules that allow this, but it would be considered very dodgy. Legality does not typically factor, though anywhere in which it matters, either the entire game is illegal anyway or the ...


4

To answer you title question: No. You are obliged to use 2 and only 2 of your hole cards. There are main 2 differences between Texas Hold'em and Omaha Hold'em. The number of hole cards you have. The number of hold cards you must use to create your final hand. In Texas Hold'em you get 2 hole cards dealt to you, but are not required to use any of them to ...


4

He's talking about what Daniel is thinking. He's saying that Daniel is pretty sure that his pair of 2's is the best hand, unless Laak is holding a 9, which he could be (from Daniel's perspective). So he's not saying that Laak needs another 9 on the river to win; he's saying that IF Laak were holding a 9, then he would be winning after that 9 on the turn.


4

Using Roberts Rules an ante is defined as A prescribed amount posted before the start of a hand by all players. So the ante has no effect on the amount paid by blinds. Each player posts there ante before the hand starts. These chips are then moved to the pot and its in effect 'dead money' it has no bearing on how much players play in blinds. I'm not ...


4

An explanation of how these numbers were derived is available in Johanson, Michael. (2013). Measuring the Size of Large No-Limit Poker Games. Essentially those are the number of card combinations from one player’s point of view in a heads-up limit Texas hold’em game after merging strategically identical combinations. How to count different card combinations ...


3

Consider the best 5-card hand that each player can create from 5 cards. (Since you didn't specify the suits, this assumes that nobody can create a flush.) Players 1 and 2 have A 7 A J 5 5 5. The best hand from these cards is a full house: 5 5 5 A A. Player 3 has J J A J 5 5 5. The best hand from these cards is also a full house: J J J 5 5. Since the ...


3

shujaa's answer is completely correct for Texas Hold'em. There are other poker games where you are required to use a certain number of hole and community cards. For example, Omaha Hold'em is dealt similarly to Texas Hold'em, but each player gets 4 hole cards instead of 2; and in the showdown, your hand must use exactly two of your hole cards and three ...


3

Assuming you mean in Texas Hold'em (which you should probably state), then they tie. In Texas Hold'em, you make your best five-card hand out of the seven cards you have available to you. It sounds like from your description that Alice was holding 8 J and that Bob was holding 4 Q which would mean that the board had to have on it (since both of them had a ...


3

I've encountered several systems of marked denominations on poker chips... The first is as follows, and is also what's listed at about.com: White, $1 Yellow, $2 Red, $5 Blue, $10 Grey, $20 Green, $25 Orange, $50 Black, $100 Pink, $250 Purple, $500 Burgundy, $1000 Light Blue, $2000 Brown, $5000 The second is: White $1 Red $5 ...


3

There is no official color scheme for chip values, and it varies from venue to venue and by country or governing body if any (Nevada does not regulate chip colors). New Jersey does have a Gaming Control board that does regulate the chip colors. (I couldn't find an official link). These colors match up with many of the standard colors you find in home sets. ...


3

No. You can't re-enter on the button (or the small blind)(at least in any game run by sensible and fair people). This would require moving it past the player who has just been in the hands where they paid their own blinds, denying them the position opportunity you are trying to aim for. The earliest you re-enter is one before the button, defeating the ...


2

The key to making this decision is if you are going to run a cash game, tournament, or both. If it is a cash game the buy in and blinds will determine what the values are. If the buy in is $10, then there is no reason to have a $100 chip. The small blind/ante should determine the smallest value of the chip. In my own home game, standard buy in is $25 and ...


2

As the creator of the game, you can certainly change whatever rules you want. But consider that people will value the various cards on the relative strength of the hands they could go for. If you change the strengths, then they will change their betting patterns to adjust. Ultimately, however, the real question is - do you need to change it? And by that I ...


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