19

You can just "jump over" other cities. From the rulebook, p. 5 (emphasis mine). A player may add any city (if there is room in the city for the player) to his network, regardless of its distance from his other cities. The player may build through a city without placing a house there if he wants or (more likely) if there is no room in the city. edit:...


14

someone we play with regularly insisted on a rule that you're not allowed to purchase a "lower" technology power plant than you already have. e.g. if you have 13,17,25 as your power plants, you can't buy 24 or lower if they come up. Incorrect. You can buy any power plant that is in the market (the lowest four numbered plants). if a player didn't win ...


13

Your power plant capacity has no bearing on the size of your network. So you can build as many houses as you can afford. From the rules: A player may connect to any number of new cities in a round, as long as he can pay the building and connecting costs. Of course, it's probably a bad idea to build a network substantially larger than you can power. ...


12

Talk about it. That's it; make the game a topic of conversation. Talk about it at random moments. Talk about your strategy when you're breaking out the game to play again. Talk about other players' moves while they're moving, and what plans they might be laying. Talk about how to break up an opponent's strategy, or even how to break up your own strategy. ...


11

You have to either move them to an appropriate power plant or lose them, if you cannot store them. From the Rulebook, p. 3, emphasis mine: During the game each player can have only 3 power plants at any time. When a player buys a fourth plant, he must discard one of his other power plants. The player may move resources from the discarded power plant ...


10

You did do something wrong: the market should always be in order by cost. When players add new power plants to the power plant market, players rearrange all power plants in the power plant market in ascending order with the 4 cheapest plants in the actual market. That's the whole market - all 8 power plants - that you sort. (The lists you provided ...


10

No, this is no part of the original ruleset; the base-game rule has never changed and remains as you quoted: if nobody buys a Power Plant, then at the end of Phase 2 you discard the lowest Power Plant and draw a replacement. Source: it simply doesn't exist. On the contrary, your friend's house rule is imbalanced; discard the lowest one only if the first ...


9

It sounds like you are mixing different uses of the word "round". When the rules say "Exception: In the first round of the game, each player must buy a power plant" it means round as in a full round of the game, where there's auction, resource buying, etc. But you seem to be using round to mean a round of the action phase, where 1 plant is auctioned off. So ...


9

In all of your cases A chooses the next power plant. The rules are quite clear: When a player other than the player who started the auction wins the auction, the auctioning player may choose a new plant to auction from the actual market or pass A will keep putting power plants up for bid until either A wins a power plant auction A passes (and is out ...


9

Your understanding is exactly correct. From the rules: When the auctioning player wins the auction and gets the power plant, the next player in turn order takes his turn at offering a power plant for auction, if he has not already purchased a power plant this round. If he has, the next player in turn order may start an auction, and so on. When a player ...


9

If all the cities on the map have been filled in (35 cities in 5 regions), then SOMEONE will have built 14 cities and so the game ends -- 13 cities each for 6 players is only 78 of the 105 available places. Its not necessary for a player to be able to power all 14 cities -- they just have to build them to trigger the end of the game. The player who powers ...


9

This is a common problem among beginner Go players; they tend to focus on short-term tactics and lose sight of the big picture. Even if they win their battles, they're still likely to lose the war. I find the best tool for teaching long-term strategy for such cases is game reviews. In Go clubs, it's not uncommon to see a game disassembled after the match ...


7

The rulebook is confusingly worded. The "Exception" is calling out a graphical peculiarity, not a rules difference. The resupply for Uranium works the same as for every other resource: you take the specified number of units and place them on the most expensive slots available. This exception is calling your notice to the fact that there are four extra ...


7

Have you tried looking at any of these? I've ordered that list by popularity, so the stuff at the top should be the most useful. There are lots and lots of summaries and crib sheets available. Which one works best for you is really a question of personal taste.


7

If you're interested in the direct answer and not in the reasoning behind it, scroll to the bottom of the post! A simple option is to just only use the new plants. Their internal balance is somewhat improved. That being said, it does change the game dynamic from the regular game. Early plants are more effective, so a game can be shorter. That can actually ...


7

Players can put their starting house in any city that another player does not have a house, including one that shares a region with another player's starting house (as long as its in one of the regions that are in play for that game). The rules state: Each player starts his network by choosing any city (not already chosen by another player) in the ...


7

There's a relatively direct translation of the Elo rating system to multi-players: just treat each game as a set of games between each pair of players, with each pair having a winner and a loser based on their relative final rank in the game. See http://www.tckerrigan.com/Misc/Multiplayer_Elo/ for an example of an even simpler method: pairing each player ...


6

No he is not. According to the rules (Pdf): The player chooses one power plant from the actual market (top row) and then makes a bid to purchase it (the player must bid at least the minimum bid (number of the power plant), but may start with a higher bid. The player starting the auction must start with the opening bid. If he wins the bid he must pay ...


5

If you are the only one to build no cities in round 1, you will go last in round 2. The determine turn order step in round 2 is not straightforward at all; in most games I see, players build different numbers of cities in round 1, ranging from 1 to 3. That your play group has been skipping the turn order step in round 2 means you have probably been playing ...


4

This is a good question, and I'm afraid I don't have a great answer. I think the creators addressed this question a bit with the creation of the Benelux board. When you play with that board you always remove the lowest power plant. That speeds things up a lot.


4

A string is allowed - just make sure there's a way to get from any chosen territory to any other. I'd say that a less interconnected map introduces an extra challenge - it makes city choice more important since it's easier to get boxed in. Since this can be frustrating, I'd recommend a more interconnected map for new players.


4

The rule is not referring to the number of cities the plant can power. It is referring to the number of the plant -- the unique number that you use for ordering the plants in the market.


3

It's the number of powered cities you are actually supplying. Taking a look at the rules you quoted (p. 10, Winning the Game), I am emphasizing a few phrases: In the following Phase 5 (Bureaucracy) players do not earn money for powering cities. Instead, they check to see which player supplies electricity to the most cities in his network using the ...


3

Although not clearly defined in the rules, adjacent areas are areas that have direct connections between them, i.e., it is possible to get from one area to another without having to cross through a third one. Example: yellow and red USA areas are adjacent, as there are the St. Louis - Kansas City/Memphis connections. Practical rule: in the base game at ...


3

Yes, it's a misprint. From the game publisher: Oh, that is a misprint. As far as I can check this, all three numbers are missing in Newport. Of course this city should have the same numbers as all normal cities (10/15/20). Sorry! Henning (2F-Spiele)


3

I would try to get my "non-strategic" friends to start at the end, and then thinking "backward" to the beginning. For instance, in Settlers of Catan, you need 10 victory points (VPs), and you start with two (your two settlements). So you need eight more. Speaking of which, how do you get those eight? You have three more settlements to place, (3VPs), and ...


2

Regarding some previous comments about hiding your money. Your cash is the ONLY thing that is private. The rules allow this, and it is a critical aspect of the game. Not knowing if someone can win or not on the next turn makes it exciting, sees if you were paying attention, makes you guess, second guess, triple guess. If I was the one who could win this ...


2

The other question is about beginner tactics so do read that, however I'll cover a couple of common confusions for first timers Board regions (in the base game) have no meaning other than to decide the size of the playing area. The rules describe setting up as having one area per player. That should be read as "if you have three players use a 3-area-sized ...


2

For a beginner, I would say no expansion is necessary at all. Vanilla Power Grid is an incredibly deep game. I have found that it can be a bit overwhelming and introducing additional complexity will only make it harder. Personally, some of my favorite games (Agricola and Dominion being two examples) I grew bored with the base game quickly and vastly ...


2

There is a significant disadvantage to kicking off Step 2, which is something a player will have to do deliberately by building their sixth/seventh/eighth city (depending on the number of players). As you point out, the other players will be much more interested in saving their money to buy the (likely-cheaper) second spot in several cities instead of buying ...


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