Hot answers tagged

13

TLDR: Great cards do not significantly drop in price when they rotate out of standard, as great cards are usually playable and viable in other formats. When a card is great, and used across many formats, there is no reason for someone to reduce the card's price when they sell it. This includes when it rotates out. Though, there are some things that DO ...


10

Here's one possibility for what you're looking for: a search for all of the cards that TCGPlayer.com sells (directly or as a middleman) for at least $200. At this time, it lists 64 cards in that range.


8

It would probably be many cards from the very beginning of MTG. It was a special time in MTG. R&D was virtually non existent and there is a lot of cards that would never again see the light of day because of there ridiculous over powered nature. There is also the issue of the reserved list that ensures many of these cards scarcity. If Star City Games ...


6

Is the card from a set in the 8th Edition - Fifth Dawn range? If yes then this is not a misprint. (if no, then that is an interesting find indeed...) This was when the Magic card frame was changed and it was decided to print "mana symbols in running text in black-and-white instead of color" for a number of reasons. This decision has since been ...


5

Anecdotally, I'm not seeing any sharp price drops. Logically, this makes sense. Browsing through the price histories of the highest valued cards from Eldritch Moon on mtggoldfish, I have not been able to find any sharp drops in price corresponding with the set rotation. Logically, this makes sense. The amount of Standard play you can get out of Splendid ...


5

Prices vary somewhat naturally, especially if you find a motivated seller, or desparate buyer! In general, prices are pretty stable and slowly creep up over time. A reprint can drop prices quickly, but most of the below have difficult rights situations and are unlikely to see full reprints (AoR had a foreign release a while ago). Games are valuable if ...


3

While it is sometimes the case, not all foreign cards are actually worth more than there English counterparts. Nonetheless, older cards definitely might be. While you can check eBay, this is likely your best source: http://www.hareruyamtg.com/en/ If you can't find a reference anywhere, check other foreign languages of that card, such as korean or russian....


3

Of course, it all depends upon definitions... This article claims that to go "all in" on Advanced Squad Leader, you need to drop $3200. But, presumably you meant "a single box"? If you use EBay as a way to track prices, as of today, there's a $1K price on Advanced Civilization, and the second highest at $600 is ... Queen's Gambit. Those are asking ...


3

Another concept is magiccardmarket.eu (also known as magickartenmarkt.de in Germany), which is a user-to-user trading site. Anyone can sell their cards at a self-defined price, which has the interesting side effect that you can see what cards actually sell for very well. It features both private and professional sellers, and will indicate the difference. To ...


3

Due to their rarity and inconsistency, there isn't really an established market for misprint cards. You may be able to find individual collectors who are willing to purchase misprints, but the value will often depend both on which card it is and how it was misprinted.


3

The most expensive magic cards are: Richard Garfield special occasions- these cards are special editions the Richard Garfield had printed for special occasions in his life. They were really only given to friends and family. They are so rare to even find one for sale is a ridiculous task. Summer/Edgar magic Dual Lands(or anything summer magic)- these ...


2

The most expensive cards tend to be things that weren't intentionally released. WotC does test printing of cards and many of these have made it outside of the company and can be worth 10s of thousands of dollars. There was a large test printing of 4th edition done by a different printer, many displays of these were retrieved from a dumpster at WotC and are ...


2

You have a few options actually. TCGPlayer: Will give you market price and median Ebay : Will give you what people are asking for the cards AlternativeWorld: Seems a bit outdated, but it may help. Hope this helps. Edit: Also I noted that in your question you referred to it as CCG (Collectible Card Game). If you do your searches with TCG (Trading Card ...


2

As murgatroid says, there isn't a good estimate for any card, but there are a few guidelines. Major misprints are more valued by collectors than little ones, so miscuts where some other card from the sheet is visible are better than off-kilter cuts or shadowed text. More famous or rare cards typically have more demand, because misprint collectors are still ...


2

I’ll borrow an answer from The Street. The collectible market is a tricky one, and a lot of what people believe will be valuable winds up becoming completely worthless (remember that '90s Beanie Baby craze?). The sector evolves over time, and interests -- and generations -- change. The basics of supply and demand. You unfortunately selected a collectible ...


1

High value cards hardly drop, some even increase in value over time, since they found a slot in modern or are a must play in commander (yes, even that's become an issue nowadays). Take a look at Collected Company: It is a strong card, costing about 9 to 10 Euro when Clans of Tarkir was still standard-legal. Nowadays it is about 14 Euro when purchased in a ...


1

FWIW, card games in Japan come and go faster than hamburgers at McDonalds, and power creep in those games that do survive is usually fairly rampant and unchecked. If your non-MTG cards are more than a couple years old, chances are that either the game is dead, or the game has power creeped to the point at which those cards are no longer relevant (if they ...


1

Here, it's sold for $3,800.00. I'm guessing yours will fetch a few hundred less (they are retail and try to sell for profit after all). Things to know. Don't open them. The value is on being sealed. They all contain a full set of cards, so there is no chance of getting card X or Y, there is no gamble, they are all there. That means you also have 1 ultra ...


1

Most people, and stores, that I know use reputable online sellers or mass resellers to price their cards. In the case of my LGS, here in Canada, that's Face to Face Games. For US prices, Star City Games is pretty popular, and as a mass reseller indexing site, I see TCGPlayer used a lot for pricing. For Euro pricing I believe CardMarket is a popular one. A ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible