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-1

The probability of having a desired card in the hand,at the first draw of seven cards, is, by removing the commander, (7/59) * 100 = 11.8644% If, at the first draw, the desired card has not arrived, then, according to what is stated in the question, you will draw again using the mulligan; and then the probability of reaching this point, which is obviously ...


1

Suppose you're playing a three player game with wheat, barley, and corn. For one of the trading players to win with wheat, the two trading players must have nine wheat between them, which is the same as the shut out player not getting any wheat. To get a hand, we choose 9 cards out of 27. There are C(27,9) ways of doing that, where C is the binomial ...


2

This is actually deceptively simple. A full set includes every card of that type in the game. If you possess a card in a specific set, then nobody else can complete that set. If you possess cards from every set, then no set can be completed without trading with you. The flip side is that if there is any set that you lack cards from, then that set can ...


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(I'm mostly ignoring Bull and Bear rules here, but I think they can be added in with a little fiddling.) If you just want to know whether it's possible, then it's not a question of probability but of showing that there is at least one arrangement of cards that would allow a player to win without trading. And it's pretty easy to see that this must exist, ...


0

According to a Ted-Ed article entitled Here's how to win at Monopoly, according to math experts ... the average game of Monopoly takes about 30 turns per competitor... Reference https://blog.ed.ted.com/2017/12/01/heres-how-to-win-at-monopoly-according-to-math-experts/ So the answer to your question is 120 turns (4 players times 30 turns/player) By ...


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