19

You have several options if you want to collect a large set of generic components so that you can throw your own prototype together. Thrift Store games you buy just for the components If you frequent thrift stores regularly, you can pick up cheap games ($2-$4 usually) specifially just to harvest the components from them. Some good examples from the list ...


13

There are several ways to implement timers in board games Tokens. Games like Paper Tales or Pixel Tactics (starting from 2nd set) use addition/removal of tokens from game components to track passage of time. Like this: this option works well for cards (or other components you can easily store tokens upon) with relatively small number of simultaneous ...


9

Not sure if this is the right way to offer a suggestion I have thought of myself for feedback, but... A time bar Labelled 0-5 or so, various items are put on the time bar, and everything is brought one step down at the beginning of my turn. Normally, most of my action points are just set at "1" when used, to be regained next turn. However... In this case, ...


8

I was thinking about dealing some tiles on the board in the beginning at random and limiting the total numbers of tiles available You need to try it and see. It's the most natural solution, and that's what playtesting is for. If it turns out not to be fun, you can always bail midgame. Other suggestions: Are all the symbols the same rarity? If some are ...


8

Not quite what you are after, but maybe one of these may help: Adobe InDesign InDesign is (as far as I know) the industry standard for card design, and while it is not specifically made for this purpose, it can most certainly do it, and is the only solution I know of that can directly import a PSD file. The actual card data can be kept in a separate file (...


8

I would recommend building your own timer out of something like card stock with spinning wheel, something similar to the design below (pardon the MSPaint): The Bottom layer: The base of the Timer, it holds everything else. The Middle Layer: It has four support posts in the corners and a central wheel that can spin freely. The wheel has been subdivided into ...


7

My first published game has a map of seven hexagonal tiles, so I have some experience with this. If you must have hex tiles (e.g. a case where the board layout is user-generated as in the 4x game E C L I P S E, not fixed as in Catan or as in my game), then I would buy a bunch of blank tiles from The Game Crafter or Amazon. Our earliest prototypes used ...


6

An open-source boardgame engine, could be what you are looking for: Vassal Engine http://www.vassalengine.org/ It provides counters, cards, board and does not enforce any rules, it provides solely "component handling". You need to create your own module (a container which holds all components as images and text) and then you should be able to send that ...


5

You're in luck. Fantasy Flight Games sells sets like this in a variety of colors. Another possible source is your local craft store. Not sure if they have these in your area, but Michael's and Hobby Lobby(slightly better selection) are worth checking out. There's usually an aisle devoted to wood crafts. You can usually find lots of nice inexpensive ...


4

I use Inkscape with the Countersheet extension for this. It can do everything you need (if I read your question correctly) even being able to choose icons on a per card basis (not a #dream). It can also handle custom card backs as well. Best of all it's completely free It works with a svg+csv text file type combo. Here's a tutorial if you'd like to ...


4

You should definitely keep track of CardForest. It lets create card games by simply specifying the rules in an online code editor. You just write your rules in CoffeeScript or JavaScript (see reference) and get a working online multiplayer game. note 1: It is in closed beta. You can submit a request to join on the website note 2 (Disclaimer): I'm building ...


4

This week I made a card game prototyper, it converts your google docs or csv to printable cards. http://card-game-prototyper.herokuapp.com/


3

Promoting a board game (design, prototype, print&play or kickstarter) should definitely involve BoardGameGeek, and similar communities. I could expand, but everything's covered in this article: http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/322382/game-design-self-publishing-resource-game-designer You should provide print&play materials for playtesting groups, to ...


3

What I do is buy some adhesive name badges from office max (office max number 412-587 or avery labels 5395) then a few decks of the same playing cards from the dollar store. Then I just print out the labels and stick them to the cards. The labels cost less than 20 bucks for 160 of them


3

One Solution would be to start with index cards. No need to look fancy until you are sure you are happy with what you have got. (this could depend on the kind of card game. Like if you are using a game that can use standard playing cards then go with the obvious, however if you are making a trading card game or something then this solution could work for you....


3

Rather than using story cubes (which as noted are probably going to run you a fair chunk in bulk and aren't necessarily customizable), you might be better off just picking up some blank wooden cubes such as the ones found here or here. Probably a lot cheaper, and you can put whatever you'd like on them instead of having to settle for what's on the story ...


3

Building on the timeline answer: If you have a board already, put a timeline around the edges - a strip of squares/hexagons/triangles representing turns. Each box that can hold tokens that indicate that certain events will happen which this turn is reached. (Any actions that occur every n-turns, regardless of game play, can be directly printed on the board.)...


2

I'd recommend something like Tabletop Simulator. It lets you set up an online digital table (you can add a password so that only your collaborators could get in, or playtesters). In there you can create custom components and even use the built-in ones for quicker prototyping. Then for keeping track of rules and so on, you could use Google Drive, which ...


2

A really fast way to prototype card games I found out is to use Excel to create your cards, and then use Word mailing directory function to import data from an excel spreadsheet. Then you just print then out and put inside a card sleeve protector from a random card you don't use anymore. A good idea too, is to use Google Docs Spreadsheet and edit your card ...


2

I realize this is an older post but I found it to be a good resource and had a resource I thought was useful so I thought I'd add a little to it. Similar to the Thrift store answer, in the states we have Dollar Tree stores, where everything is one dollar. I've seen chess/checkers/dominoes/etc. all of which have a number of pawns or tokens for use. I ...


2

Spielmaterial.de has lots and lots of generic components. The web shop is outdated and clunky, so you´ll spend some time finding what you need, but there is a lot to be found. They're based in Germany but ship to the Netherlands, so probably to the UK as well.


2

Another UK source, especially for any quantity, that I've used in the past is Plastics For Games Ltd. (Not used them for years so I've no idea if their service is as good as it was, but their site is still active). Note they do have a minimum order of £100.


2

A 3D printing service would be an ideal solution. I have no experience with any of the online services available, but as an example Shapeways seems to offer the option to print in a variety of plastic and metal materials, including the most common metals such as Steel, Silver, Aluminum, Gold, Platinum, Brass, Bronze, etc. Shapeways 3D Printing


2

A gold smith/jeweler could do your thing from metal and look elegant, but it might be quite expensive.


2

I've been using Tabletop Simulator for a couple of weeks now, and it's really easy to create components and play a game. Has physics simulation and nice rendering to make it feel more realistic. Just another option to consider.


2

Roll20 is a website primarily designed for digital RPG games, but I know that it includes dice, tokens, a playing field, uploadable images, and a variety of other open ended tools for DMs and players. However, it sounds like it may be usable for your purposes.


2

I would recommend having a starting block. This could be a 4/4 printed board with some of the symbols on it. Players could then add their tiles to this block. You could also draw some tiles randomly and build this block. It may be less balanced, but a random starting condition often makes games better. You could even have a suggested starting block for ...


2

First, I'd make sure this is a real problem. The beginning game of "play a tile" should be really quick, so it may not be as big of a deal as you think it is. I'm thinking of some of the "flip a tile" games for exploration, where it's an obvious move, and those plays go by quickly. I like sitnaltax's idea of limiting the board to a fixed number of tiles. ...


2

First you'll want to build up a fan base. To do that, you could: Introduce it at board game meetups and conventions. Send print and play files to interested people over the internet. Show it off on board game forums. Once you have a fan base, then it's time to think about options for publishing the game. I wouldn't recommend spending any money on ...


1

When I needed to do this, I printed my hex tiles onto a full page shipping label. Then I stuck the label sheet to foam board and cut the tiles out with a knife. I recommend 1/8" foam board. The foam board is stiff and very easy to cut, but is light and not suitable for use in a strong breeze. As another answer stated, cutting out hexes is tedious. To ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible