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22

Historically, pro ranks were an indicator of playing strength. It was said that 3 (later: 4) ranks are about a stone difference. To my knowledge, there never was a time when 1 rank difference actually meant 1 stone. In the 20th century, there was a sudden and increasing change in the strength of new pros. This is generally considered to be a consequence of ...


11

There is no ELO rating in go. And even no official international rating at all. A common question in go forums is "how does my rating in [whatever country or online server] compare with [other country or online server]". The European Go Federation is maintaining an international rating system where Ke Jie is rated 2956. goratings.org is an individual ...


11

Let's start with the basics. Beginners start out as "30 kyu". As they get stronger, the number decreases to 29 kyu, 28 kyu ... down to 1 kyu. Kyu means "student" and is commonly abbreviated 'k'. The range from 10k to 30k is called DDK (double digit kyu) while 1k - 9k are SDK (single digit kyu). The difference between each rank is supposed to be 1 stone of ...


7

There are three determining factors for how high the highest Elo rating for a given game will be: Internal aspects of the rating system: First an foremost how the ratings are initialised. If you start out with everybody getting a rating of 2000, the numbers will stay higher than if everybody gets 1800. But also K-factor (how strong ratings fluctuate) and ...


7

Probably the best way to gauge a player's strength (aside from playing against them of course) is to present them with Tsumego of varying difficulties. From Sensei's Library: Tsumego, a Japanese go term adopted into English, are problems mainly about life and death, but also about ko, capturing races, cutting, connecting, etc. As a rule they are local ...


5

The ELO system, as it was originally designed, has a mean of 1500 and a standard deviation of 400 points. The central limit theorem defines how many people can exist by this model depending on their distance from the mean. For example, a rating of 3100 is 4 standard deviations from the mean (1500 + 4 x 400 = 3100). According the central limit theorem there ...


5

I don't have an understanding of Go ratings, but I think you are comparing apples with oranges, i.e. Go elo ratings are not meant to be compared to Chess elo ratings. This quote is from comparison of go rank with chess rating It's not really possible. You could use the European GoR system to give a rough comparison, but the problem is that it's not ...


5

In addition to the way proposed by Nathan, I would like to add a few further ideas. Winning percentage One simple way to judge the relative strength of two players is to look at their mutual game history (if it is large enough, of course!) and consider the percentage of won and lost games. For instance the EGF rating system has this property: This ...


4

I can't really speak to the details here - I don't even play go - but I looked at their description of their rating system, and it seems that you've misunderstood the rating system somewhat. In particular, statements like "losing even game to 11k is perfectly fine for 13k, it only means you are 12k or weaker" aren't completely true. First off, keep in mind ...


4

Just to add a few notes in addition to Pieter's answer, and with a hint to your implied question (can AlphaGo beat Lee Sedol?): First off, I'm not sure if you thought being 9p automatically means being stronger than 2p. This is not the case. However, in this particular instance, other matters are of more importance. Fan Hui has not been competing in Asian (...


3

Obviously, AlphaGo is the top AI now. Besides it, a simple way to find information about Computer Go Ranking would be to search for : Computer go tournament Here is a list of Go AI from wikipedia There's a special website called Computer GO that registers past and future tournaments. There's also a website for KGS Computer Tournaments According to the ...


3

I believe your information comes from this unofficial rating system: http://www.goratings.org/ Fan Hui's page on that site: http://www.goratings.org/players/1480.html Fan Hui only only played a few pro games - none recently - so his ranking there (or any other pro ranking system) is unreliable. 1P-9P rankings are not ratings (you only go up) and don't ...


3

If you have two games each of which ranks players using the ELO rating system, then the game with higher rankings is generally viewed as "more complex" than the game with lower rankings. In the sense that there are more discrete levels of learning to mastery. It is not clear to me which ranking systems are being used in your statement, but for the ...


2

Your first question is largely answered by my answer to your other post. You lost a game to another player, whose rank was maybe the same as yours, maybe not, and that has to decrease your rating a little bit - in this case it was enough to cause you to drop (maybe you were close to the boundary between ranks, who knows). And it's all based on current rank,...


1

There are some good answers to the main question, and this is only to address the sub-question related to trivial games such as tic-tac-toe (because I think it is an awesome question;) Assuming adult, competitive play, where every competitor knows the solution, then outcome of every game would be a stalemate, and all players would have the same ranking. ...


1

Is there any official and accessible world ranking ? No; Rankings are done by national Go organizations, with some variance existing between them. What is the exact rank of Fan Hui ? As reported here, Fan [Hui] earned a 2-dan professional ranking in China before emigrating to France, so it appears that go software has reached the level of ...


1

There is no way to know your opponent's strength based on the information you posted. KGS adds the question mark to alert you about an unreliable rating, because that account has played too few games. Another clue is the graph itself. Important variations like this are typical of accounts with few games. Maybe that person only played one game in February ...


1

At the professional level, rank differences are very slight. ON AVERAGE, it may take a three or four rank difference in pro rank to equal one stone. But ranks are largely a matter of achievements; how many games or tournaments you've won. It could be that a gifted "newcomer" (few victories, hence relatively low rank) is actually stronger than a higher ...


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