Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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8

As TimK pointed out, the situation could be but may not be a Seki but without a diagram to show to us, it's not easy for us to guess what happened. Seki : no one die, everyone live $$cm1 $$ +---------------------------------------+ $$ | X . O X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | X . O X . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | X X O X . . . X . . . . . . . . ...


6

During the game $$ $$ ------------- $$ | a b O X O . $$ | X O O X O . $$ | . X , X O . $$ | X X X X O . $$ | O O O O O . $$ | . . . . . . The corner is not settled yet, as both players can choose to: either start a ten thousand year ko, white by playing at a and black by playing at b or settle for a seki, if black plays at a or white plays at b. At ...


5

Actually, White is dead after you fill that liberty. He can never attack the Black stones, but Black can capture the stone in the corner. After that there is a ko that will kill White. There's no way for White to win the ko - filling it in leaves the white stones in atari. At the end of the game when White has no more ko threats, Black can take the ko, ...


5

Both the black and white stones are alive, so no points are scored for either side here.


4

I will only discuss the Japanese pro rules, since as far as I know there are no official European rules. The tournament of the European Go Congress 2015, for example, was played with AGA rules. I think most European tournaments are played with "Verbal European-Japanese Rules" which usually require to fill all dame points and kos before the end of the game. ...


2

This situation is called Seki. Scoring depends on the ruleset you're using.


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