29

Look at it this way: If you properly randomize your deck, then its initial configuration is irrelevant. So "mana weaving" is just wasting more productive time. If you don't properly randomize your deck, then "mana weaving" is likely part of you cheating. So, there's no upside. "Mana weaving" doesn't actually accomplish anything, unless you're accidentally ...


18

No, you can't do that. From Comprehensive Rules (bold mine): 707.6. If you control multiple face-down spells or face-down permanents, you must ensure at all times that your face-down spells and permanents can be easily differentiated from each other. This includes, but is not limited to, knowing the order spells were cast, the order that face-down ...


14

The pile shuffle recommended by Jonathan Hobbs works OK, although I'd strongly recommend randomly varying the order in which you deal out the cards to make it more random. The main issue with it is that the randomness comes almost entirely from the shuffler's choices, rather than from uncontrollable physical randomness as in a riffle or mash shuffle (not ...


14

This is called random pile shuffling. Wikipedia defines pile shuffling as: Cards are simply dealt out into a number of piles, then the piles are stacked on top of each other. Here is a YouTube video demonstrating pile shuffling. Trivia At a Magic: the Gathering tournament, pile shuffling by itself is not a sufficient means of randomization. Two others ...


13

As long as neither player has information about the order of cards in a deck of cards, no player can gain an advantage from a "bad" shuffle. A "bad" shuffle could be defined as a shuffle that does not, by a reasonable standard, erase all information remaining from the end of the previous game, most notably the order of cards. This does not mean that there ...


10

As Jefromi points out, the deck is not left in a randomised state unless there's only one of the card being removed in it. Now, you could pick one of the matching cards at random, but that becomes complicated and error prone. (What if there are three matching card, but the 3rd party only sees two?) I would not accept this. Original post follows. In what ...


10

The elephant in the room here is probably that it's kind of hard to really thoroughly shuffle a deck. Around 12 riffle shuffles will do it for a 60-card deck, with a few more needed for bigger decks. (The complicated expression given in the linked paper is pretty well approximated by 2·log2(n), so doubling the deck size requires two more riffles to ...


8

There are variants of Magic that remove deck shuffling and other sources of non-determinism, but they also make other major modifications that make the game very different from normal Magic. One example is 3-Card Blind, in which any number of players each submit a deck containing 3 cards. Gameplay is as normal, except that attempting to draw from an empty ...


8

I am a card magician and a programmer who has written deck shuffling simulation software. This gives me a unique (but by no means authoritative) perspective on this question. Overhand and Hindu Shuffles The overhand shuffle really should be adequate for anything less than 10 cards. If this method doesn't feel comfortable in your hands or if you don't ...


8

If we assume that when you say that you shuffle thoroughly, you mean that you completely randomize the order of your deck, then it should be fine. If you put your deck in any particular order, and then completely randomize it, then the original order doesn't matter and your deck is properly shuffled. If you put your deck in a certain order and then "...


8

An almost perfect riffle shuffle of a 52 card deck is not perfectly random, but should be sufficiently fair for any casual purpose. I decided to test this experimentally. I coded up a quick python function* to perform riffles and almost perfect riffles. When performing a perfect riffle, the code takes a "deck" of integers and rearranges them so that the ...


7

The best way to shuffle a deck is to use multiple different methods of shuffling one after another. As the rules state pile shuffling can't be used except at the start of the game that is perhaps the best way to start your shuffle. After that the Overhand Shuffle, sliding a few cards at a time from one hand to the other so that the cards in each group stay ...


6

The Magic tournament rules have this to say (emphasis added): 3.9 Card Shuffling Decks must be randomized at the start of every game and whenever an instruction requires it. Randomization is defined as bringing the deck to a state where no player can have any information regarding the order or position of cards in any portion of the deck. Pile shuffling ...


6

How to shuffle (theoretically) It takes 7 riffle shuffles to randomize a deck of (52) cards. If you're playing a 60 card format 7 riffle/mash shuffles are sufficient. If you're playing commander which uses 100-card decks, you'll need to riffle shuffle 9 times to be randomized enough. Shuffling more does make the deck more random, but 7 (or 9) iterations ...


5

1) "Pile shuffling" is not actually shuffling, in that it doesn't randomize your deck. Let's say you have a deck of 60 cards and you number the cards 1-60. Then you "pile shuffle" those 60 cards into 8 piles and number those piles 1-8. Then you know for a fact that card 1 is at the bottom of pile 1, card 2 is at the bottom of pile 2, and so on, and you ...


4

You are not supposed to be "ensuring" that you get a good hand on the first draw. Theoretically, each player should start the game with their deck in a random permutation. Any 7 cards should be a possible starting hand. Rule 103.1 says At the start of a game, each player shuffles his or her deck so that the cards are in a random order. Each player ...


4

I almost always use Overhand shuffling when dealing with board game cards. Video shows it on poker cards but it can be applied to smaller formats as well. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VZByHu_NUJs


4

Your wife is confusing 'random' with 'balanced' Human beings, in general, have a terrible understanding of probability. There's a rather popular probability demo that teachers use, where they'll give half their class coins and ask them to flip the coin 100 times and record the results. The other half the class is instructed to attempt to fool the teacher ...


4

There are certainly games in which a bad shuffle can benefit one player. I remember playing Ligretto, also called Dutch Blitz, against my teenage nieces who were winning far more frequently than even teenage reflexes would indicate likely. In Ligretto the cards end up stacked in order, and there is a distinct advantage to having low cards on the top of your ...


3

As long as you draw the whole deck before shuffling discards, it doesn't matter. Simply put, all cards in a well shuffled deck are equal. (Or have an equal probability of being this or that.) Splitting the deck, drawing in the wrong order, or intentionally drawing from the middle of the deck, or even shuffling the deck between draws does not matter, if ...


3

I usually use a riffle shuffle with sleeved cards with not problems. What I do is have the top of the sleeves pointed away from me, split the deck into two parts, and riffle them so they are in a V shape with only the bottom right corner of the left pile over lapping the bottom left of the right pile. If you sill cannot shuffle them that way the next best ...


3

While cards are equally thick across the surface, cards in sleeves are not. They get thinner near the edges. This makes for a very easy faro shuffle. But generally, just make sure you're shuffling the cards along their long edges. This prevents cards falling out of their sleeves and sleeves intertwining.


3

For me, I would divide the deck into smaller parts that you can handle. Riffle shuffle (or any way you like) those and mix the small decks together, one group at a time.


2

In a tournament: No. Never. Definitely no. The MTR refers to "shuffling" (as well as cutting) and "randomization" in the same breath. A judge could permit another person to shuffle for you, but not shuffling at all -- regardless of who is responsible for "randomization" -- is deeply sketchy. In a more casual setting, you might be able to convince your ...


2

For the smaller stacks, any not-riffle shuffle like overhand shuffling works well. But I find that many of the Arkham Horror decks get too big to shuffle easily with any normal method. For the big decks, you can shuffle a little bit by hand (overhand shuffle or whatever you're familiar with), then spread them around in the box lid, shake them around, then ...


2

A perfect riffle shuffle is not very effective at randomizing the cards. Cards from one half of the deck are (perfectly?) interleaved with those from the other, not changing the order of any cards relative their previous neighbors, but only leaving zero or more cards (one, in a perfect shuffle of a perfectly cut deck) from the other half between them. ...


2

It's true that there's no statistical difference between a card taken from the top of a perfectly shuffled deck and a card taken from the middle of the deck. (Assuming that no one has already looked at the top cards.) The caveat is perfectly shuffled. Humans, in general, are rather bad at shuffling cards. For a standard 52 card deck, it takes about 7 riffle ...


2

From the Ticket to Ride official rules: Draw Train Car Cards – The player may draw 2 Train Car cards. He may take any one of the face-up cards or he may draw the top card from the deck (this is a blind draw). If he draws a face up card, he immediately turns a replacement card face-up from the deck. He then draws his second card, either from the face ...


2

The answer to this question is going to depend on how you are shuffling the cards. If you are doing a standard riffle shuffle then as long as you can do a decent shuffle you should not need to do it more then 7 times. In most games shuffling the deck 3-4 time is enough to provide the randomness that the game needs. It should also be noted that even if you ...


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