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11

No trumping the first trick is definitely a house rule, insofar as rules for the game actually exist (there are no official ones). It's hard to say exactly how common it is; for what it's worth I think most people I've played spades with used it. But I haven't found it listed as an actual rule in any of the versions of the rules I've found. So sure, you ...


8

As in most traditional trick-taking games, a player must follow suit if able. Breaking spades only allows a player to lead spades, i.e. to play a spade as the first card of a trick. Players can only play a spade on a non-spade trick if they have no cards of the led suit.


8

The deuce of club and hearts do not considered a spade in the standard game, however there are variants where they do. From Pagat: In some versions of Spades, some or all of the four twos are elevated to the top of the spade suit, are ranked in some specified order, and are considered to be spades. The rest of the cards rank as in normal. For example, in ...


7

The two games have some similarities. But they have a lot of differences too. Spades is a lot simpler, and so going from Bridge to Spades is relatively easy. Going from Spades to Bridge, well you're slightly ahead of the curve in having played a trick-based partnership game, but there is still a lot of other stuff to learn. To be honest, any general ...


5

It depends on a lot of context whether leading an Ace is a good idea. When to lead an Ace: Leading an ace when you have strong control of the suit is good. For example, leading from A-K or a bare Ace is good. Since you can win any follow up, you don't really lose much if your opponents playing low. And it can also give your partner an idea of the ...


5

What's the alternative to bagging out? If you over bid, you risk losing the number of points of your bid. If you under bid, you have a good chance of making your bid, and any bags are effectively minus points for that hand, but you still get the points for your hand. For example, a bid of 9 that doesn't make it sets you back 90 points. A bid of 5 with 3 ...


5

The smaller amount of information in Spades means it is hard to purposefully start a finesse, but you can still easily continue one if it is started by accident. For example, your partner happens to lead small and first opponent plays small, and you are holding the AQ. You can now play the Q and hope that the K is not in the remaining opponent's hand. In ...


4

No trumping the first trick is an unpopular and bad house rule. A strong indication that this rule is not popular can be found in the big online Spades sites that do not offer this house rule: Spades Royale, Spades plus and Spades free. (and they do offer tons of variants to choose from such as: Jokers, Nils, Boston, Break spades, bags penalty) The rule ...


4

You may find the jump from Spades to Contract Bridge much larger than you expect. However the popularity of (generic) Bridge pre-dates the invention of Contract Bridge by Harold Stirling Vanderbilt in 1925. If you have a gaming group interested in advancing their card-play skills together, you might consider jumping first to one of the antecedent games from ...


4

A low/high sum of bids can mean anything. The sum of 4,4,4,3 is the same as 1,1,1,12 (exaggeration), but those two mean completely different things. Instead of looking at the sum of the bids, you get more information from looking at the individual bids. It's safe to say that an Ace or king of any suit is likely to take the trick it is played in. As ...


4

TLDR: The probability is about 8%. Distribution of diamonds for any deal With no restrictions at all then dealing a pack between four hands results in the following probabilities for distributions of diamonds: (0, 0, 0, 13): 0.00% or ~1/158753389900 (0, 0, 1, 12): 0.00% or ~1/313123057 (0, 0, 2, 11): 0.00% or ~1/8697863 (0, 0, 3, 10): 0.00% or ~1/646948 (...


4

The partnership that have more points. That is the partnership that scored 505. The 1 points per overtrick is a real point, not just an indicator of bags. From Pagat: The side which reaches 500 points first wins the game. If both sides reach 500 points in the same deal, the side with the higher score wins.


3

Some of the strategy will depend on the bids of the non-nil players. In Suicide Spades, the non-nil players must have each bid at least 4, but that could still be anything between 4 and 13. A bid of nil is equivalent to a bid of 10 in terms of points (100 if you win, -100 if you lose), so a non-nil player who has bid in the realm of 10 is as concerned with ...


3

You got had! Nice play by your opponent (South). Terminology: A finesse is the play of a lower card than the highest held - in an attempt to create an extra trick - by the third hand playing to the trick. South on this hand employed a ruse to create the extra trick by leading the lower card (Queen from holding topped by just Ace-Queen). There are Game ...


3

Your method of adding [Spade-Length] - 3.5 seems reasonable, except I would halve that whenever partner has already made a bid of 4 or higher. Any bid in excess of 3 is very likely to include Spade length, and it is desirable to avoid double-counting that asset. Even when partner's bid above 3 is solely based on high card strength, that reduces the value ...


3

In general, you are better off bidding accurately or 1 books under so you can make your bid and get positive points (rather than getting set and taking negative points). So yes, in general some small amount of bags is better than getting set. As stated in other answers, there are statistical dynamics that depend on what score you are playing to (300, 500, ...


3

Given that there isn't exactly a single set of "official rules" for Spades, I would say that there two valid answers: 1) Tricks collected by a set (failed) NIL bid count as tricks for the partner, at which point all normal rules apply as far as sandbags, making the bid, etc. The team loses -100 (or -200 if it was a double/blind Nil) for the set nil, but ...


3

Turn them loose with a computer simulation at first so they can get lots of hands in. Only after seeing the general structure of play will they understand what to even consider when bidding. I suggest a computer simulation as it means you don't have to spend time playing with a completely clueless person and they can learn on their own. If you situation is ...


3

I have never heard of the "No trump on first trick" rule. I've heard that you can't lead with spades until they've been broken (trumping someone else's trick). Can you? Have to agree with Jefromi's response on this one. But your idea going forward would help alleviate any stress mid-hand. You could also announce all other house rules (if any) before ...


3

Spades and Contract Bridge share most of the same mechanics as far as play of the cards are concerned, and this has long been a matter of disagreement between experts. Also, the style of playing from AKx bears on what is appropriate from lower touching honours. Three main styles have developed in Bridge: Traditional: Highest from touching honours at the ...


2

If you are playing with a regular partner, you may introduce some conventions. This includes things like underbidding in front of partner and expecting them to adjust for it. Many players I see always underbid and prefer to play a bagging game rather than risk getting set. The problem is that by underbidding, you are losing out on all those 10s that you ...


2

Typically, both in Spades and Hearts, I've seen the "no trump on first trick" rule used if and only if the "must lead Clubs on first trick" rule is in place. This keeps wisacres from setting up a forced situation. Personally, I prefer to allow the opposite rule pair, i.e. no restrictions on (non-trump) suit leads for the first trick, and trump/dumping ...


2

It depends. Have you and the opponents bid for most or all of the tricks? If so then your left hand opponent (LHO) will probably not let the trick go by for fear of going down themselves. If not, and RHO has led a low card, then partner's nil may be in danger and you probably won't have to work hard to get your bid, so you need to protect partner from LHO ...


2

In a nice spades strategy guide (written by Buckey) the situations to lead spades are the following: Your partner has their bid or you can cover their bid. You know your partner bid high spades. Not leading spades might just give your opponents a chance to set you by trumping with lower spades. Either one or both of your opponents are void in any non-spade ...


2

Sounds like Cassino (also called Casino according to Wikipedia).


2

The play would be a lot less strategic than at Spades, because it won't be possible to draw trump, and it certainly won't be possible to draw trump and then run a side suit. This is one major consideration of play that would be lost. Indeed, you would never lead your trump suit unless forced to, because that burns your trump but not other players' trump. ...


2

Your proposed hand is an excellent hand to bid nil. Because literally the only issue is with the Q♠ I'd try for it whenever partner bids does not also bid nil and your team doesn't have a huge lead or is about to win the game. Remember that your opponents have no particular idea of where the weaknesses in your nil hand are, so they won't necessarily be ...


2

The rules (in most spades rulesets) prohibit showing your cards, yes. That said, what you describe is a pretty common practice in friendly games, as (as you note) the rest of the hand's play is foregone. Note the Wiki entry's inclusion of the TRAM section (added in 2012, with no cited sources) also includes a paragraph on penalties for doing so ...


2

There are no hard and fast rules or heuristics for such a decision, but the following indicators will tend to be positive in such a circumstance: When one is clearly the strongest player in the game. Strong players play well and weak players play poorly, of course; but under stress of an overbid deal weak players can be expected, typically, to exaggerate ...


2

In addition to Forget I was ever here's answer, it's appropriate to bid to 14+ tricks where your hand is disproportionately strong by itself (like comfortably bid 7 or more) and no one bids nil. This doesn't happen too often, since monster hands for one player usually mean that someone else is bidding nil which can change bidding and play patterns. Very ...


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