7

No, there is no limit to the number of huts a player can have. The space on the board is simply done that way for design; you do not have to put 1 hut in each space. From the rulebook, page 7: The player places the acquired building on one of the corresponding spaces of their board. Once a player has more than 5 buildings, he stacks them on these ...


7

There is actually a difference between the wording of the English and German rules, that I think is significant. The English rules say: (Each time the player moves his marker forward on the trader track, regardless of how far, he takes 2 decorations.) In the German, by contrast: (Jedes Mal, wenn der Spieler auf der Händlerleiste vorrückt, ...


6

I think this thing of skill in games tends to be a little of too much pride and taking the game a bit more serious than it should. In general I think it's best just to take a high risk once in a while if you think that 'luck' is not going your way; if you loose laugh about it and enjoy the game :) Onto the house rules to modify results: Die result for ...


4

You're playing it right. From the rules (page 6): Each player places their [Civilization] cards face-down on the corresponding space of their player board. In other words, no one can see which cards you have. The only exceptions to this rule are the one-use tool cards. They are kept open until they are used. One-use tool cards


3

There is no official clarification to my knowledge, so at least you are not alone in this matter. A strict reading of the rule book, would lead me to the same conclusion you came to (emphasis mine). The player moves his marker on the trader track 2 spaces forward (and takes back his two figures). He also immediately takes two decorations. (Each time the ...


3

No, the "one-use tool" cards do not count for scoring tool makers. The rules specifically call out "Tool tiles" in the scoring section: The "one-use tool" cards are exactly that: cards (i.e. not tiles). Nowhere in their description are "tiles" called out:


3

According to the rules: http://www.zmangames.com/uploads/4/7/1/7/47170931/en-stone-age-ext_rules.pdf A player may: Trade only once his marker has moved off of space 0 of the merchant track. Only trade in order to acquire a Civilization card or Building tile. Trade the resources and jewelry of their choice. Improve his trading ability ...


2

It is in fact a strong strategy to simply never feed your people. This is because unlike some other games, the penalty for not feeding is exactly the same whether you are just 1 food short, or if you feed no people at all. If you take the mating hut every chance you get, then you will have 10 workers, and without ever sending them to hunt for food or go to ...


2

The best way to feed your people, is to make sure you have just enough food. Sure you can feed them other resources, but those resources will cost you at least 50% more (in terms of dice eyes). It's a lot easier to just get the food out. Food is a means to an end, it won't score you any points. As the game develops, you can see where your chances of ...


1

The accepted answer, while correct, is overly brief. Luck can be reduced in several ways in Stone Age, especially when you think in terms of reducing wasted pips (a pip is 1 dot on a die): When you have no tools, try to concentrate your workers on a single resource each turn. For example, on forest you'll waste 0, 1, or 2 pips on each roll. Your waste per ...


1

As I was playing it many times with two players only, I wanted to remove as much luck as possible. The tools hut may help, but it hardly does in the first few turns, which might be the most important ones. I could eliminate most of randomness using this rule: For resource production use one die only. For each two workers simply count 7 pips without ...


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