22

Here is one I made: (click for full size - hosted on 27ld.com)


12

Talk about it. That's it; make the game a topic of conversation. Talk about it at random moments. Talk about your strategy when you're breaking out the game to play again. Talk about other players' moves while they're moving, and what plans they might be laying. Talk about how to break up an opponent's strategy, or even how to break up your own strategy. ...


9

This is a common problem among beginner Go players; they tend to focus on short-term tactics and lose sight of the big picture. Even if they win their battles, they're still likely to lose the war. I find the best tool for teaching long-term strategy for such cases is game reviews. In Go clubs, it's not uncommon to see a game disassembled after the match ...


7

The two games have some similarities. But they have a lot of differences too. Spades is a lot simpler, and so going from Bridge to Spades is relatively easy. Going from Spades to Bridge, well you're slightly ahead of the curve in having played a trick-based partnership game, but there is still a lot of other stuff to learn. To be honest, any general ...


7

Depending on the size of the group and the time allotted: Get games where people do not loose, though people can win. E.g. everybody keeps playing until the end and the player with the highest score wins.Not a game where people get killed and then have to watch the rest play for another 4 hours. (Titan, I am looking at you). Do not get uber long games. E.g. ...


7

Eclipse is a complicated game. If you have never taught the game yourself, expect a teaching game to take 4-7 hours. It took me about 20-30 minutes to learn the game. I am an experienced gamer, had browsed the rulebook, and the player teaching me had taught others before. For a first-time teacher and inexperienced players, I estimate teaching will take at ...


5

Start simple, build their knowledge step by step and only introduce new concepts when they're comfortable with what's gone before. When I introduce a new player, I always start with the basics: MtG is a card game using a deck of shuffled cards The colours of magic and their themes (Red - destruction, blue - subversion, green - power etc) The types of cards ...


5

I'd suggest than any of these games would be both fun and really helpful: 1) Snake Oil Snake Oil is a party game where the players create a products to pitch to prospective buyers. The game is a lot of fun and it is extremely rich linguistically. Good for practising: relative clauses, describing, pronunciation of compound nouns, linking ideas, clauses ...


5

My friends and I have taught a bunch of different people how to play bridge, and we've developed a system over the years. It basically boils down to: go slowly. Don't overwhelm them with information. The first time that I play with them, I tell them nothing more than the rules. No conventions, no HCPs, no nothing. Just the literal rules as required. We ...


4

You may find the jump from Spades to Contract Bridge much larger than you expect. However the popularity of (generic) Bridge pre-dates the invention of Contract Bridge by Harold Stirling Vanderbilt in 1925. If you have a gaming group interested in advancing their card-play skills together, you might consider jumping first to one of the antecedent games from ...


4

My recommendation is to: Introduce recording of the games. This would allow her to study her own games offline, and come back with questions. The habit of recording one's own games is a gift beyond price, and the sooner introduced the stronger the habit will be. Ask this young girl her own opinion on these questions. A sense of control I believe is vital, ...


4

Join a Go club with strong players. Your club mates will give you comments and hints. Visit Go conventions and go to Go tournaments. If joining a Go club is not practical for you, consider to take some payed Go lessons by a professional player.


4

GoKibitz is a new website that offers a nice frontend for discussing games. I did not use it myself, but it looks promising. I have no experience how strong the players are which are commenting regularly, however I saw at least many 1d or 2d comments. If you are willing to spend money on getting regular full reviews on your games I can highly recommend In-...


3

N.B. The links to terms are for third parties, rather than the questioner, who as 7 kyu will already know them. Where she is now The best approach depends on the sort of person she is and what she hopes to get from playing go, so stay alert to any feelings, wishes and opinions she expresses. As Forget I was ever here’s answer says, I think you should find ...


3

I would try to get my "non-strategic" friends to start at the end, and then thinking "backward" to the beginning. For instance, in Settlers of Catan, you need 10 victory points (VPs), and you start with two (your two settlements). So you need eight more. Speaking of which, how do you get those eight? You have three more settlements to place, (3VPs), and ...


3

I once saw a good suggestion elsewhere on the web: in a one-on-one game, allow the kid to swap places with you at any point in the match. The original example was chess, but it would work with many duels. Dominion and Star Realms would be as easy as swapping decks. Helps to keep a bored child's interest if he gets to pilot a winning strategy for a while. It ...


2

With some experience as England and Russia, I can say this: England: England is a safe country. Negotiate with France or Russia (one of the two) and then attack the other and raid the neutral territories they might want (Spain/Belgium or Sweden/Norway). Make lots of fleets and dominate the coastlines before using the convoy order to move further inland. ...


2

A "third" handicap other than material or time is a "propositional" game. An example is that you lose (or cannot win) if you have lost all your pawns before administering checkmate, no matter what else happens. That proposition would lead you to play out your pawns more conservatively at the beginning of the game, and perhaps not use pawn storms. Other ...


2

Try something new. A new opening, or relying overmuch on an unusual piece. This works best when the junior opponent knows how to play and is getting the hang of your usual opening, but you are still better. Try something wild and new, it might be a disaster, it might actually work, either way you might both learn something. PS - Especially fun in ...


2

There are a few handicap ideas I use: Material Advantage Time Advantage Swapping colors midway through the game Material Advantage: Depends on the difference in skill of the two players. For beginners playing against moderately good players, you can take off whole pieces such as Queens, or Knights (since Knights are notoriously good against beginners due ...


2

I think an important thing when you are introducing new games to players, especially if the players are not used to these types of games, is to explain the dynamics that will be new to them when they play this game. If they are familiar with Settlers of Catan, maybe try and explain some of the new mechanics of whatever new game you are playing in terms of ...


2

The best training for playing chess is the game itself. But if you want to "dumb down" the game, then remove the two sets of knights. Those are the pieces with "special" moves that are relatively hard to understand. The other pieces all move on straight lines and/or diagonals. There's really no need to play with simplified rules. There are only five ...


2

At that age they will have a bit of trouble just figuring out how pieces move. It will take a few games for them to remember it. In games with kids that are too young to quickly grasp how pieces move I simply make sure that on nearly every move I have a piece available for them to take (for free), and the problem I pose to them is which piece they can take ...


2

Here are my suggestions of games that teach various card game rules, ranked in order from least difficult to most difficult. Go Fish has simple rules and can help you learn basics of card games, such as Identifying matching sets of cards Identifying card names and suits Waiting your turn Communicating with opponents when required (and being truthful about ...


2

OGS has a review requests section. I just got a great review there so I'd like to share the link.


2

The Go Teaching Ladder is a good place to get comments on your games. Unless you're already a dan player, you won't get comments from 6d+ players, but you also don't need them. Your game will be reviewed by a player several stones stronger than you, and they will be able too see enough of your mistakes to help you get stronger.


1

Some Go tournaments will feature professional commentators who will also play several "simultaneous" games with players, typically for a small fee, such as $10 or $20 a head. They will remember the salient points of those games and point out the most egregious errors. These professional commentators also observe and comment on games, but typically only if ...


1

I started to play "Tschau Sepp" with my son who is also four years old. This is a swiss version of Mau-Mau. It is similar to Uno but uses a regular set of cards. He likes to play it but still needs some help as he often misses that cards in his hand have the same value (number) as the played card. Therefor we often play with our hands shown.


1

I have some Expierence with Italy and Austria. Italy: don't focus yourself to one area. Take bits here and there, and make sure to talk to everyone. If you talk to everyone, you can directly influence how the game goes. For example, turn Austria against Turkey with yourself. Turn England and Germany against France before sneaking in and taking Marseilles. ...


1

I use Battleships as a teaching tool in my English Foreign Language classes, so I've developed a simple way to teach the game to my teenage students. I'd recommend breaking the game into steps, something like this: Start with a real world example. "This is a game about ships at sea. They can't see each other, so they use maps to try and hit their target." ...


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