25

It depends. As a teacher, the most important is to reach your student and provide him the information he wants and requires in a way he can understand. You have to see how he likes to work and adjust to him accordingly. However, I can give you general advice as well. Time settings and at what point to explain The teaching process should start prior to ...


24

I highly suggest taking him through the puzzles in Polgar's book. The book starts off with very simple chess problems, with only a handful of pieces, with the idea of "solve for checkmate in x moves". The problems are designed with a logical progression, highlighting specific tactics and strategies, and become increasingly complex and demonstrating more ...


21

To best understand the answer to this question, it helps to understand the purpose of bidding and bidding systems. Bidding is an attempt by two partners to predict the number of tricks their combined hands can win in the play. The purpose of bidding is for each partnership to ascertain which contract, whether made or defeated and whether bid by them or by ...


21

Here is one I made: (click for full size - hosted on 27ld.com)


18

There are a variety of ways to level the playing field in chess. The two most common methods are material advantage and time odds, although there are also a number of more exotic handicaps that one can conceive of (e.g. giving away free moves, requiring a given piece to give checkmate, allowing the King to move two squares, etc). With material handicaps, ...


16

In my experience, the order in which you introduce games is only of minor importance in comparison with understanding what kind of person you're dealing with and what games that type of person would like. So the key is introducing different types of games to identify the gaming personality type. Here are a few gaming personality types I've run across, and ...


13

Yours is a good idea: introduce him to the pieces gradually (though not too gradually - five-year olds learn fast!). Here's another one: to make sure the rules of moving stick, place a piece on the empty board before each game, and ask him to point out all the spaces that piece can move to. After he's got that down (a few days/weeks, depending on how often ...


13

I'm going to go for a "so simple it's possibly insulting" answer here. Hopefully it won't actually be taken amiss! Bridge is a complicated game. There's a lot to take in, and in many ways there is no end to the amount of obsessive fine-tuning you can do to your system. A beginning player who has just brought a fat Bridge tome and read bits and pieces of ...


12

How to study Go wrongly, a practical reference Even though you already directly pointed in the right direction, let me disregard part of your actual question and answer differently first. Consider it a supplementary answer. A common mistake in studying I believe there is a typical trap many Western players easily fall into (I'm guilty of this myself): ...


12

Talk about it. That's it; make the game a topic of conversation. Talk about it at random moments. Talk about your strategy when you're breaking out the game to play again. Talk about other players' moves while they're moving, and what plans they might be laying. Talk about how to break up an opponent's strategy, or even how to break up your own strategy. ...


11

When I started working on my chess, I improved a lot just by playing at least one game a day with more experienced tournament players who would point out reasons why I lost afterwards. It was definitely more efficient than just reading chess books, which I did on the side. If there is a chess club nearby, you should definitely check it out. I am guessing ...


11

2 sections to my answer: How to get up and running in 20 minutes Next steps to progress from the 20 minute version to solid Bridge beginner How to get up and running in 20 minutes It's simply not possible to play the full game of bridge itself after 20 minutes in a way that satisfies or even makes any sense. However, one can make use of a Gateway game ...


10

I think you should teach them as soon as they're old enough that they won't eat the stones. One thing you have to watch out for with really young players is that they will focus too much on capturing, and you have to try not to encourage that. I started teaching my daughter when she was five, and she's surprisingly good at reading. Unfortunately she hasn'...


10

Here are some things you can do. Keep in mind for the first game I'm usually more interested in teaching people how to play than winning, especially if I know the game well. This method might not work as well with a mixture of old hats and newbies. Play with an open hand (maybe even have the other players do the same). This of course only works in games ...


9

Whom to teach You definitely can teach beginners. Showing scoring, atari, ladders, simple shapes and tsumego is not a problem at all, and as your students improve, you will still be able to give them a few hints, show them tesuji and shapes they missed. You should however bear in mind that your knowledge is limited. You can't be completely sure about some ...


9

Technology has helped me convert/graduate more players than any other tool that I have used. Consider Dominion: this game is very easy to play online. You click on cards that are in bold and then you click "end turn". Notice that arbitrary button-pressing will probably never lead to a victory, but that the game mechanics can be easily learned since the ...


9

A system is proper use of conventions. Genuine beginners don't need any conventions, so don't worry about what system to use. Just start with "If you have 13 points, bid your longest suit, or the stronger of 2 equal" and a few similar rules. (As Joe implied, use the weak or strong no-trump that is common in your area; neither is intrinsically more natural)....


9

This is a common problem among beginner Go players; they tend to focus on short-term tactics and lose sight of the big picture. Even if they win their battles, they're still likely to lose the war. I find the best tool for teaching long-term strategy for such cases is game reviews. In Go clubs, it's not uncommon to see a game disassembled after the match ...


8

When I introduce friends of mine to games, I find that the most important thing is the time cost. People are unwilling to even try games that will take up hours of their lives. As far as I'm concerned, the number one gateway game is Dominion. Others have mentioned it already, but I'll give you a couple of reasons why I love to cajole non-gamer friends to try ...


7

Get a book of checkmate problems, and go through the whole thing. Then find another, and do the same thing. When you are done, you will have no problem attacking. Once your feel comfortable with simpler checkmate problems, get a book of general problems. After all, in a real game, not every move is forced checkmate :) One of my favorites (which is ...


7

I am teaching an 8-year-old right now. He is so competitive that he was immediately addicted. We play with all the pieces. I think this is fine because he wants to feel he's being challenged and playing like an adult. When he wants to move a piece, and isn't sure what his legal moves are, he just asks me, and we talk through which moves are a good idea and ...


7

I find the main factor that affects game introduction is the learning curve. Even if people enjoy playing new games, they generally don't enjoy actually learning them. The longer the interval between "Hey, would you like to play a new game?" and "Okay, we're ready to play.", the less likely any novice gamer is to stick around. Even if they do survive the ...


7

Depending on the size of the group and the time allotted: Get games where people do not loose, though people can win. E.g. everybody keeps playing until the end and the player with the highest score wins.Not a game where people get killed and then have to watch the rest play for another 4 hours. (Titan, I am looking at you). Do not get uber long games. E.g. ...


7

Eclipse is a complicated game. If you have never taught the game yourself, expect a teaching game to take 4-7 hours. It took me about 20-30 minutes to learn the game. I am an experienced gamer, had browsed the rulebook, and the player teaching me had taught others before. For a first-time teacher and inexperienced players, I estimate teaching will take at ...


7

The two games have some similarities. But they have a lot of differences too. Spades is a lot simpler, and so going from Bridge to Spades is relatively easy. Going from Spades to Bridge, well you're slightly ahead of the curve in having played a trick-based partnership game, but there is still a lot of other stuff to learn. To be honest, any general ...


6

My method of teaching is to point out the opponent's worst mistake, usually made more than once in the game. If s/he can correct it, that may alone represent an improvement of a rank or two. I might go over a small part of the game, but wouldn't go over a whole game (even if I could). Most learners would benefit more from having one (or two) mistakes ...


5

Wizards has a new product released this month (September 2012): Booster Battle Packs (MSRP $9.99) Each Booster Battle Pack contains: Two 20-card semi-randomized decks Two 15-card Magic 2012 Core Set booster packs Magic "learn to play" guide Rules insert The ad copy says: Each pack contains a pair of semi-random decks, each with land appropriate for ...


5

I'd suggest than any of these games would be both fun and really helpful: 1) Snake Oil Snake Oil is a party game where the players create a products to pitch to prospective buyers. The game is a lot of fun and it is extremely rich linguistically. Good for practising: relative clauses, describing, pronunciation of compound nouns, linking ideas, clauses ...


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