31

The terms Johnny, Timmy, and Spike refer to the three player Archetypes that were outlined by Magic Card Designer (among other things) Mark Rosewater in a blog post, and later revised on the Magic the Gathering website. They are used to categorize players based on what their motivations to playing the game are, what types of cards they enjoy, and what ...


25

"Draughts" is a family of closely related games, so you need to be more specific about exactly which game you mean. English draughts is exactly the same game as (American) checkers, the one played on an 8x8 board - and as someone brought up in the UK, I can confirm that is what people in the UK mean by "draughts". International draughts (also called Polish ...


22

A common way to describe this in game rules is surrounded or 'surrounding spaces`. As an example from the rules of Carcassonne A monastery is completed when it is surrounded by 8 tiles. Each of the monastery’s tiles (the 8 surrounding tiles and the one with the monastery itself) is worth 1 point.


18

"Local" implies familiarity, and some connection specifically to you. It's a store near you, it's convenient for you, it's something from your area that you can be proud of, it's part of your community, it's a place you might see people you know. It also implies that it's not a chain. All of this adds up to a more warm and fuzzy emotional connection. Brick ...


17

To give a short, simple attempt at answer to kick things off: I would say that a roleplaying game must be partly comprised of hidden information that has been invented by one or more of the players. That's the key difference I can see between The Arkham Horror/Mansions of Madness (boardgames) and The Call of Cthulhu (roleplaying game), where both are ...


17

In mathematics, specifically in the field of cellular automata, picture one is known as the "Von Neumann Neighborhood" and picture three is known as the "Moore neighborhood" or the "Conway neighborhood" (referring to Conway's Game of Life ). (Sometimes these terms include the center cell as part of the neighborhood, i.e. the center cell is considered to be ...


14

The player psychographic profiles known as "Timmy", "Johnny", and "Spike" were introduced in an article by Mark Rosewater on the official Magic: the Gathering website in 2002. In his own words: Timmy Timmy is what we in R&D call the "power gamer." Timmy likes to win big. He doesn’t want to eke out a last minute victory. Timmy wants to smash his ...


14

It's an acronym telling you which cards you should pick. Cards fall in one of five categories, and you should (usually) pick the card from topmost category (B > R > E > A > D) which is still left in the pack. In a nutshell: Bombs, powerful cards that win a game if unanswered. These can be something that generate an advantage every turn (e.g. The Immortal ...


13

The term started to be used in Classic Sixth Edition. In Fifth Edition, Spell Blast says total casting cost. In Sixth it says converted mana cost. Pyromancy also says total casting cost, and Urza's Legacy was the set immediately before Sixth. Sixth introduced many major rules changes, including the removal of interrupts and the introduction of the stack. ...


12

For the third situation, a term I see quite frequently (perhaps because I'm a chess player) is that the blue squares are a King's move away from the black one. This is similar to your "a King can attack all squares" but it's shorter and can be used as a compound modifier.


11

The canonical name for these seems to be 'Mana Rocks', probably so named after one of the very first, Fellwar Stone.


11

It's identical; it's just a new way of writing it introduced in Kaladesh. The release notes explain it: “Create” is a new term for an old concept: the act of putting a token onto the battlefield. [...] To create a token, put it onto the battlefield under your control. This new term doesn’t represent any functional change from tokens as you’ve known them. ...


11

The move a Knight makes is typically called either a "Knight's move", or "L-Shaped". There aren't really any more common names than those, as the Knight and it's move are both relatively unique, and predate western chess; being one of two pieces that were directly imported from Chaturanga (the other is the Rook) in their current form. You will occasionally ...


10

All of the top hits on Google refer to MLD as "mass land destruction", i.e. cards like Armageddon. Or, to quote one of the moderators on MTGSalvation: MLD is mass land destruction, so generally speaking, any card that destroys multiple lands at once. This is usually indiscriminate, so Ruination is considered MLD while Sylvan Primordial is not. Back to ...


9

This may depend a bit on the context, and if you can define the phrases used beforehand, or if you need to use something that's immediately clear to everyone. If we think about, say, writing the rules of a game, the easiest case would be where all parts of the game only care about one sort of adjacency. Then you could mention at the very start of the rules ...


8

In an archetypical board game, the action focuses almost exclusively on that which can be represented by state on the board, state on a sub-board, or marker substitutions. Further, board games generally operate on the principle of "What is not explicitly permitted is forbidden." The board itself versus the Narrative In a Roleplaying game, the board ...


8

Network's ability is a triggered one, which triggers, as stated, when Network enters the battlefield. All creatures with power 5 or greater will be exiled when this ability resolves (unless something happens, like Network being destroyed before it resolves), and will stay exiled until Network leaves the battlefield. If the ability was worded, for example, "...


8

The second option is correct: the Aligned Hedron Network has a triggered ability, that exiles a set of creatures when it enters the battlefield. This exile effect lasts until the Network leaves the battlefield, at which time the creatures return to the battlefield. It does not continuously exile creatures that enter after it does. First, the rules ...


8

Johnny, Timmy, and Spike are three basic types of Magic players, or "psychographic profiles," that the Magic R&D team use to create new cards and determine the metagame for new expansions. Creating (and naming) these player profiles provides an easy way to examine how different playstyles will be affected by new game mechanics. Mark Rosewater has an ...


8

Generally, if you want to learn about the rules in-depth, you can check the current, official rules, either the basic rulebook, or the comprehensive rules that include everything but are intended to be read to look up specific details rather than from beginning to end. State-based actions are a set of rules that are automatically checked throughout the game,...


7

Local Game Store is supposed to be a counter to Big Box store that sells games. So instead of the generic large Wal-Mart chain. FLGS (Friendly Local Game Store) refers to your distinct, independent and local (usually not chain store) independent game store. (Also sometimes referred to as Mom-n-Pop Stores) In a more contemporary context it's also used to ...


7

Simply "adjacent" can naturally be used to mean a square is either "diagonally adjacent" or "directly adjacent". Another phrase, if it's mentioned before that distance is counted as 1 per straight or diagonal move, would be to say "within one square" or "one square away" or "one distant".


6

Johnny (and Jenny), Timmy (and Tammy) and Spike are the three player psychographs that are used to describe what people get out of their Magic cards. Mark Rosewater explains them in a Making Magic article. The crib notes are: Timmy / Tammy Timmy cares more about the quality of his win than the quantity of his wins. For example, Timmy sits down and plays ten ...


6

State-based actions are things that the game causes to happen automatically. Each time a player would get priority (when a player is able to act), the game first checks to see if there is anything that needs to happen. There is a list of a total of 24 things that the game checks for (though the last 5 only happen in special types of games, like Commander ...


5

The term is variant. There are usually 3–4 variants of each basic land in a set. Promos offer an alternate art variant of the card. The term was also used to describe the Unstable cards that had alternate functional variants.


5

First, I want to note that "mill" as a deck strategy name is just named after "mill", which is the common unofficial (now official) name for the action of putting cards into the graveyard from the library. Following that pattern, the name of a discard strategy would just be "discard" Discard alone generally isn't a strategy ...


4

How is a board game not a role-playing game? Let's say you have a board game game with these elements: an Overlord (GM) that commands the Monsters and sends Heroes on Quests.. multiple players that take on the roles of characters in the game (PC) Timmy always screaming, "Death to the Orcs" whenever he rolls for an attack. Board games can be role playing ...


4

According to Wikipedia: Puppet Stayman, initially developed by Neil Silverman and refined by Kit Woolsey and Steve Robinson in 1977-78 If you can locate copies of the April 1977 and April 1978 editions of The Bridge World magazine that might have more details on the history of the system. As to why it's called puppet stayman, this page has an answer ...


4

Roughly, to most people, a "strong" deck is one that'll tend to win against other decks in its format, and a "weak" deck is one that'll tend to lose. It's about winning and losing, though, not as much how you win. Note that "in its format" is a pretty big deal - strong Standard decks are completely different from strong Vintage decks. Why isn't speed of ...


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