48

It's a Dungeons & Dragons convention The "d" dice notation originates with Dungeons & Dragons, which innovated in the use of multiple types of polyhedral dice and often requires multiple such dice to be rolled at once. The frequency with which rolls are required necessitates a dice notation in order to present it in an abbreviated form. It ...


31

It is less confusing to say "twenty D six" (20d6) than to say "twenty six-D" (20 6d), which could be interpreted as a "twenty-six-D" (26d). Having the D act as a delimiter between the quantity of dice and the number of faces of the dice makes it explicit which number applies to which part of the statement. Then to get to "...


25

"Draughts" is a family of closely related games, so you need to be more specific about exactly which game you mean. English draughts is exactly the same game as (American) checkers, the one played on an 8x8 board - and as someone brought up in the UK, I can confirm that is what people in the UK mean by "draughts". International draughts (also called Polish ...


22

A common way to describe this in game rules is surrounded or 'surrounding spaces`. As an example from the rules of Carcassonne A monastery is completed when it is surrounded by 8 tiles. Each of the monastery’s tiles (the 8 surrounding tiles and the one with the monastery itself) is worth 1 point.


18

In mathematics, specifically in the field of cellular automata, picture one is known as the "Von Neumann Neighborhood" and picture three is known as the "Moore neighborhood" or the "Conway neighborhood" (referring to Conway's Game of Life ). (Sometimes these terms include the center cell as part of the neighborhood, i.e. the center cell is considered to be ...


12

For the third situation, a term I see quite frequently (perhaps because I'm a chess player) is that the blue squares are a King's move away from the black one. This is similar to your "a King can attack all squares" but it's shorter and can be used as a compound modifier.


9

This may depend a bit on the context, and if you can define the phrases used beforehand, or if you need to use something that's immediately clear to everyone. If we think about, say, writing the rules of a game, the easiest case would be where all parts of the game only care about one sort of adjacency. Then you could mention at the very start of the rules ...


7

Simply "adjacent" can naturally be used to mean a square is either "diagonally adjacent" or "directly adjacent". Another phrase, if it's mentioned before that distance is counted as 1 per straight or diagonal move, would be to say "within one square" or "one square away" or "one distant".


6

You can take a look to this article. It seems that the "d" notation was introduced in order to remove the ambiguity of a mixed instructions (verbal and numerical). The "d" notation introduces a dice-specific algebra that allows you to find easily the equivalence of dice roll. e.g.: roll 30 times a d10 dice = 30d10 = 3d10×10 = take your 3 ...


4

The number comes after the 'd' since this is addressing a subtype. Consider the original sentence to be "a dice with 6 sides" rather than "a six sided dice" and it also makes sense from your language point of view. But the underlying thought here is that we want to address a number of dice of certain kind (six-sided ones). And in such ...


3

Wikipedia has a Garbage time article that defines it as follows: Garbage time is a term used to refer to the period toward the end of a timed sports competition that has become a blowout when the outcome of the game has already been decided, and the coaches of one or both teams will decide to replace their best players with substitutes. This serves to give ...


3

As far as I know: Draughts: Board is 10x10 Normal pieces can jump backwards to take a piece Kings can move several squares in each direction Checkers: Board is 8x8 Normal pieces can not jump backwards to take a piece Kings can move 1 square in each direction. They can jump backwards to take a piece.


2

While die may be the term for a single dice when you say "6-die" it sounds like you are talking about more than a single one. calling a die a "D6" or "D20" is more convenient overall and also easier to say how many of each type you want. "6 D6 and 2 D20" as an example. If you where to say it as "6 6-die and 2 20-...


2

You could describe the first example as 'sharing an edge', and the third example as 'sharing a corner'. If you need the second example, you could call it 'sharing an edge but not a corner'.


1

I think the name comes from two words, Old and Land. Eld is part of the word "elder". Other answers think that it relates to "Eldritch" but "Eldritch" also just means old. Raine is like in "Ukraine" which literately translates to Borderland From Wiktionary 1651 Ukrain, 1671 Ukraine, 1688 Ucrania, Ukrania, 1762 Ocraine. Adaptation of Polish Ukraina, ...


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