14

First of all, are you confusing influence and thickness? See my answer here for the difference. Influence and thickness obviously have to lead to territory in the end, the questions is, how? The rationale behind "Do not use thickness to make territory" is to not use it directly in a crude way. Imagine a situation like this: $$Wcm1 Black's direction of ...


8

The biggest strength of a wall is that it keeps your opponents stones from connecting to anything on the other side of it; this forces him to worry about living in general, either by making life independently or connecting somewhere else. This is the general idea behind driving your opponent into your wall: Keep harassing him to keep him worrying about ...


6

The terms thickness and influence are precisely defined and very easy to differentiate once you got the idea. Influence simply refers to a group facing the center of the board. If a group create influence and at the same time is already alive or can make eyes very easily is called thick. Note that a living group that is facing the edge of the board is not ...


4

Your last try is the correct one. You must hane at 24 against the loose Black stone. When Black plays 25, you cut one stone to its right, atariing, the hanging stone, followed by an atari diagonally from 24, and an extension from that atari stone. Your goal is to break up Black's lower side formation, giving you a "flanking" position to both the bottom left ...


3

The way to use thickness is this: When your opponent makes a move that approaches your thickness, you make a move on the FAR side of the opponent's stone from the thickness. Thereby sandwiching your opponent between the your thickness and your "far side" stone. The worst thing you can do is to place a stone between your opponent's stone and your thickness. ...


2

Thickness is indeed about the same as strength and comes with "eye potential" and "connectivity". We only speak of thickness in the context of outward influence, while strong enclosed groups or groups with limited potential for expansion are rather called "solid". Most of the answers get this part right. But "heavy" is not at all the same as "...


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