22

In Solving Quantum Tic-Tac-Toe, Ishizeki and Matsuura use a computer to search the game space to find solutions, but don't specifically speak to strategy. However, there are a few strategies we can glean from their results: Go for a half-point victory, not a full point victory. In their search they found the first player, X, cannot guarantee a win by being ...


10

As you know, tic tac toe is a solved game that end in a tie with optimal play. And it's too short to really get any initiative as the second player, even for children. Going second there is no way to force a win without 2 misplays from the first player. So if you want a "strategy" for player 2, it really comes down to just not losing. As for going ...


9

Having spent a little while looking into this, the only clear thing is that there is no firm evidence for any distant historical first date for Tic Tac Toe. Although many people claim the Romans played this game, in the form of Terni Lapilli, and point to the large number of historical boards that exist, scratched into walls, this seems unlikely, not least ...


6

My co-worker found what I believe is a winning strategy for the first player, but now I find earlier evidence by others as well. This is for the original version of the game, where you can send your opponent to an already won field and he has to place his mark there. It seems that the question is still open for the updated version where he can then choose ...


6

This is a generalized version of @Guvante's answer. O (player 2) always wins in 4. The diagonals are not necessary to achieve a win. Examples are included in bold, but this strategy works for all choices made by X. X places a piece at (a,b): (1,1) O chooses a row that is not a, and places two pieces in that row, but not in column b: (2,2) and (2,5) Now, O ...


5

You could draw a 2D array of 2D boards, like this: ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢b▢ aaa ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢b▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ c▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢▢ ▢c▢ ▢▢▢ ▢b▢ ▢▢▢ ▢▢c You'd probably want a 4x4 array of 4x4 boards, though I used 3s everywhere instead to make the example smaller. The example shows a few of the many winning lines (a-c). If it's not clear what ...


3

Optimal play on NxN boards where you need N in a row leads to a draw for all N > 2. Contemporary Combinatorics, by Bela Bollobas has a proof of it. Below is a summary of this. The images below are from this book. All board sizes 5x5 and up can be proven to be a draw by the second player employing a pairing strategy, namely where the second player plays a ...


3

This sounds like Cube Fusion, specifically the MINI Cube Fusion version as Jay A pointed out based on the number of components. From the description: The game includes a playing board with a 3x3 grid and 12 playing pieces. Each piece consists of two cubes, each with marbles in the center - one red, one green. Players take turns placing pieces on the ...


2

I have flip-flopped a few times, but think that Player 2 has an unbeatable strategy. The trick is that Player 1 needs an X in each row and each column while Player 2 needs a "box". Four O's that form a rectangle with no X's that share a row or column with said rectangle. First two O's sharing a row with self and separated by 1 square. Never put below or ...


2

BGG doesn't have any game with "Spillage" in the title. Looking at the Tic-Tac-Toe entry there is also no game that reimplements Tic-Tac-Toe which is the same as Spillage. There are a number of games which play some sort of meta-game of Tic-Tac-Toe in which there are nine 3x3 games being played and the object is to get 3 in a row on the meta-board. So all in ...


2

Noughts and Crosses/Tic Tac Toe belong to a family of games, (and in my opinion Noughts and Crosses is the runt of the litter.) Achi, (from Ghana) and Tapatan, (from the Philippines) show that such games are well distributed across the world. If we search for the oldest abstract board games we usually run into one of the Mancala family of games, (Bao, ...


1

This generalization of Tic-Tac-Toe is called m,n,k-game. (the goal is to get k in a row on a (m,n) board). Some known bounds: (source wikipedia) (5,5,4) is a draw. (6,6,5) is a draw. (7,7,5) and (8,8,5) are draws. (15,15,5) is a win. (9,6,6) and (7,7,6) are both draws via pairings. When the goal is 9 or larger (k>=9) the second player can force a ...


1

There are several generalizations to tic-tac-toe. The most natural one (imho), is the m,n,k-game, which is the game of k-in-a-row played on an (m,n) board. In (n,n,n) games, for n>2, the second player can force a draw. See m,n,k-game for many other results.


1

There are, in fact, already card games where you try to get three of your symbol in a row. Tic Tac Toe: jeu de réflexion, for example.


1

Wikipedia mentions the following under http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tic-tac-toe 'The first print reference to "noughts and crosses", the British name, appeared in 1864. The first print reference to a game called "tick-tack-toe" occurred in 1884, but referred to "a children's game played on a slate, consisting in trying with the eyes shut to bring the pencil ...


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