31

I have won games with a bad initial draw by simply forgoing tickets. This really works best when you have two tickets that are only worth 4 - 5 points. Keep the lowest value tickets, return the highest. Ignore the tickets completely Immediately aim for as many five and six train routes as possible. If you can hit the stretch of three six train routes across ...


25

He can only claim a route with length 1 because he only has one train. You will not magically get more trains because it is the last turn so all normal rules still apply. By the rules: Game End When one player’s stock of colored plastic trains gets down to only 0,1 or 2 trains left at the end of his turn, each player, including that player, gets ...


23

No, when you draw a card from the deck it is hidden to the rest of the players. Other players only know what you get when you pick one of the face up cards. One of the benefits of drawing from the deck is others don’t know what you get but you also don’t have a choice of what you get. Another possible benefit depending on the version is the ability to draw ...


22

Straight from Board Game Geek: In order to get 295 you must get one of the most important cities Miami! You end up sacrificing New Orleans and Sault St. Marie to do so. Follow the same route from Vancouver to Santa Fe, but then you deviate from there: Santa Fe -> Denver -> Kansas City -> St. Louis (Splitting Point Here) St. Louis -> ...


22

We usually just don't bother to score any points at all until the end of the game. Then, you go over all the claimed routes and score them, as well as scores for tickets to determine the winner.


20

I don't actually see any ambiguity here. You've quoted the rule saying a Station allows you to use someone else's route. I don't see how that could imply that a Station can complete a route that hasn't yet been filled in by anyone. The reason you are allowed to place Stations on any city, including currently unlinked cities, is to allow you to place a ...


20

The holder of the destination card has to connect the two cities with their own trains. The route can be as roundabout as you like though, as long as they are connected. In the Ticket to Ride: Europe version, you can build stations which then let you count another player's route as if it was your own for the purposes of scoring destination cards.


19

No, there is no limit. You could even complete a route using only locomotives. Remember that even though Locomotives are Wild and can be used freely like that, it is harder to collect them. Rather than being able to pick up TWO cards on your turn (i.e. two yellows), when picking up a Locomotive, you can only pick that ONE card. The only way you can collect ...


19

Players get negative points for any destination tickets that are incomplete when the game ends, period. Either this player got unlucky, or made a foolish decision drawing new tickets so close to the end of the game.


18

Ticket to Ride Asia has a double-sided board, one side for up to 5 players playing individually, and the other side for 6 players in 3 pairs. It's very well written and playing in pairs doesn't just mean a straightforward teaming up as you only share half your information with your partner. Complicated on first play... but all the best games are!


17

In that situation, I would recommend getting rid of one of the three, and then drawing additional tickets immediately. These additional tickets will either give you your corresponding transcontinental route to put you in the situation you like, or give you a bunch more short routes, some of which likely correspond with the ones you already have. If none of ...


17

All you need is an unbroken chain between the two cities. It doesn't matter which way you started it, how many cities are in between, or whether it is the most direct route. From the rules: Each Destination Ticket includes the name of two cities on the map and a Point Value. If a player successfully completes a series of routes that connect the two ...


17

Here are three sources of pain you try to avoid: Drawing only one resource card instead of two Drawing resource cards that you will never be able to spend Losing a race to build a link you want (an opponent gets there first, or the game ends first) The single rainbow option is the only way to get stuck drawing one card instead of two, but rainbows are ...


17

There is no way to get rid of a destination card once you already have it. Destination cards count as negative points against your score if you do not complete them for a reason (think of it thematically - you are playing as a company who has taken on a contract to connect two specific cities by train, and if your company doesn't finish the contract there ...


16

You may keep 1, 2, or all 3 destination tickets. You must make your decision before the beginning of the next players turn (not before your next turn as you stated). The only two ways you may discard destination tickets are during your beginning of game ticket selection (you must keep at least two) and when using the Draw 3 Tickets as your action for the ...


16

Allowing play to continue can give the player who is choosing which tickets to pick up an advantage: Other players may place a route blocking one of the tickets the first player was considering keeping. Seeing what colours others pick up can indicate where they're going. Another round of this can only help decide which routes are worth keeping. If play has ...


16

It depends on the number of players. The second path is available when you have four or more players. Important Note: In 2 or 3 player games, only one of the Double-Routes can be used. A player can claim either of the two routes between cities, but the other route is then closed to other players. Note that no single player may take both routes of a ...


16

You cannot pick up cars from a previously claimed route in order to claim a new route. Resource management is one of of the control factors of the game; you only get 45 cars to achieve your routes. The game meets its ending condition when a player has 2 or fewer train cars remaining. Review the rules for the game. They are written from a permissive stance, ...


15

It varies by which Ticket To Ride game you're playing. In USA, Europe, and Asia, you may do any of the following on your turn: Draw a face-up locomotive draw two face-up non-locomotive card draw two cards off the deck draw one face-up non-locomotive and one card off the deck, in either order. In Switzerland and Nordic Countries: draw two face-up cards ...


15

No, you only need one of the base games (Europe or USA) in order to access the train car cards, scoring markers and the player carriage pieces. It doesn't matter which base game you own. For example, the rules for Heart of Africa tell you: This game is an expansion and requires that you use the following game parts from one of the previous versions of ...


15

It is common that when drawing new destination tickets, none of them will be possible to complete. Especially if drawing later in the game. It makes no difference if the reason that it's impossible to complete is because you don't have enough trains, or because all routes into and out of the necessary cities are blocked, etc. Drawing new tickets is intended ...


14

The goal in TTR is not "complete the cards you're given", it's "get the most points". There are plenty of ways to do this with short routes (e.g. by focusing on building only length 4+, not going for longest route, and picking the spots where everyone wants to go). If no one in your group wants to adjust their play style to match the cards they're dealt, ...


14

You only have to make the required connection (Glasgow to France) once for 19 points. Like all destination tickets; a single ticket cannot be scored multiple times, even if you connect the locations via multiple routes. The reason that the ticket shows multiple routes is because France is a country, as opposed to a city. In the base Ticket to Ride game, ...


13

Yes, obtaining longest continuous path of routes certainly does highly correlate with winning. It's pretty simple to see why: Multiple routes that "cooperate" by overlapping are obviously more efficient than short routes in different parts of the board that have nothing to do with each other. Longer routes are vastly more cost-effective than short routes. ...


13

As for a strategy to overcome this, it seems like that you're using only one strategy which is based on completing a long route, with overlapping tickets, as the main method to gain points. Something you may be missing is that if your tickets are only short routes, you can finish them easily and them spend the rest of the time doing two things: Claiming 6 ...


13

The general rule is that if a card is drawn without looking at it, then it doesn't matter whether it's a locomotive or not - you get to keep it regardless. So the answer to both your scenarios is "yes". In fact, if you're really lucky, it's possible to draw two locomotives from the stack. When you are considering picking up a visible locomotive (i.e. one ...


13

The card distribution for train cars is in the rulebook, it is 8 colors 12 of each, and 14 locomotive wilds. There are 30 destination tickets, they can be read here in high resolution with a BGG account. They are listed here Denver to El Paso (4) Kansas City to Houston (5) New York to Atlanta (6) Chicago to New Orleans (7), Calgary to Salt Lake City (7) ...


13

Some actions you can take, in increasing order of difficulty it will impose: Don't aim for the Longest Route. Don't draw from the visible options. This will reduce the 'skill' you can exercise, making your plays more dependent on luck. Don't use wild Cards to fill out a color set. Makes it harder to get the longer routes. Knowing that they may gather in ...


13

They're discarded. From the Switzerland rules, page 2: The three Train Car cards revealed for the Tunnel are discarded. Note that train cards are never put on the bottom of the draw pile. Only when the draw pile is empty does the discard get shuffled to replace it.


13

You can claim any unoccupied route between any two locations (that does not require passing through a third location) at any time. You do not require a destination ticket showing either location, and it doesn't have to be connected to any of your other routes. You only need: Sufficient trains to cover the route. Sufficient cards to pay for it. You don't ...


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