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19

No, this is not legal as written. This is really a series of three separate trades (one of them being with the bank), and two of them are giving a resource for free, which is forbidden by the rules. The problem is that a trade can only involve 2 people, so a "triangular trade" must be done as separate trades. From the FAQ: Trade - Is a “triangular trade”...


12

While I used to play with futures trading, I now explicitly prohibit it for the following reasons: Problematic/ambiguous mechanics Consider this case: I trade you a brick and a future wood for your wheat. Later, you attempt to cash in the future trade, but I claim to have no wood. Unless it's obvious that I'm lying, there's no great way to determine ...


9

From the Official Monopoly Rules by Hasbro (my emphasis): MISCELLANEOUS: Money can be loaned to a player only by the Bank and then only by mortgaging property. No player may borrow from or lend money to another player Any exchange of money for future considerations is a form of loan, so by the official monopoly rules your actions are illegal. One ...


8

The Settlers of Catan FAQ offers an official answer: Monopoly - In order to find out which resources my opponents have, may I first offer them trades and then play my Monopoly card? Yes. However, players are not compelled to provide correct information on the resources they have. In short: Yes, you may ask probing questions about what ...


8

To the best of my knowledge, there is no "minimum hand size" rule in Bohnanza. The active player draws three cards at the end of his round, but it's perfectly possible to start your round with no cards at all in hand! As demonstrated by this line in the "1. Plant bean cards" section of the rulebook: If the active player has no cards in his hand, he ...


7

Trading in a 2 player game is a difficult problem. You can have some form of forced trading. For example player 1 (after getting granted a trade action somehow) can name a resource, which player 2, has to give them if they have it, while player 2 gets to name a different resource which player 1 has to give them if they have it. If you name a resource the ...


6

One simple way to do this is to make sure that each player has information that the other does not have. For example, each can have a hand of cards that only they can see. This way, for some trades, each player can think that they are getting the better end of the deal. Another option is to have different goals for each player, possibly role-based or ...


5

If you are simply trying to determine which resource is the most abundant, can't you just count the remaining resource cards? Isn't that public knowledge? If so, that would make this tactic unnecessary.


4

It's not a rules violation, but there are still consequences I don't think that there are any rules against it (Catan doesn't have much to say about when trade agreements become binding), but I would consider it poor sportsmanship lie about your trading plans in order to gain information and mislead your opponents. If you repeatedly act like this there's a ...


4

No. There is no where in the rules to indicate that this would be the case in any situation. The rules clearly state that The non-active players may only trade/donate cards from their hands. Beyond this, there are no other actions the non-active players make to process a trade. The rule book mentions in a side note By trading or donating cards from ...


4

While you are technically allowed to make such a deal, due to the fact that trading allows you to give another player money; there is nothing in the rules that would enforce your opponent to keep her end of the deal. If you later landed on the property in question, she would be fully within her rights within the rules to ask you to pay, and you would have to ...


4

Since this is too long for a comment, here's the way that I have played... You can promise almost anything in a trade: future cards (not necessarily meeting a minimum one card per transaction rule...I.e. they could just be forked over), future trades, future protection from robber, future placement choice of robber, etc. We have also introduced goods/...


4

We have a simple way of doing "future trades which we have successfully used in well over 100 games: All Catan rules must be obeyed (trades only on your own turn, at least 1 card offered by both parties) When a legal trade is made, a future trade can be included as part of the deal. So you can offer a brick and a "future trade" in return for a wheat (you ...


4

Deals can be "unbalanced" as long as they are "within the rules." That is, either party can offer to trade RESOURCES at 2 to 1 or 3 to 1 in "domestic trade." What you cannot do is to involve a "non-resource" consideration such as action. I can't offer two resources for one resource and an "action" (e.g. refrain from putting the robber on me) even if the ...


4

Just count the number of missing cards of each resource and subtract the number in your hand. There are 19 cards of each resource. This gets you a more accurate result and players feel less swindled.


3

The main form of "future trades" we had tended to employ in the past is based on harbours, where if I have, say, a sheep harbour where I can trade 2:1, then somebody with a large supply of excess sheep may trade them to me in pairs on the condition that I use my harbour to swap them at a better rate for some other resource that I will then trade back to them ...


3

We have a simpler version of this that adds much richness to the game despite the simplicity: "future trades." It works as follows: All Catan rules must be obeyed (trades only on your own turn, at least 1 card offered by both parties) When a legal trade is made, a future trade can be included as part of the deal. So you can offer a brick and a "future trade"...


2

Castle Panic is an excellent example of a game that does exactly what you describe. The game has two goals. The first, is the players must cooperate to defend the castle from the oncoming hoards, if they don't, they'll lose. The second goal is to be the winner by killing the most monsters. As others have pointed out, there needs to be something forcing ...


2

As you've assessed, in a two-player game, a trading mechanism seems pointless. If the trade benefits one player, then there is no reason for the other player to agree to the trade, and if the trade benefits both players equally, then the trade has no effect on the game. Well, such a statement makes certain assumptions about the game. If you relax some of ...


2

Mutual equally beneficial actions for all parties involved in a game does not provide anything to the contest aspect of games, which are often the entire point of 2 player games. Imagine a chess game where both players decided to remove all pieces except the king and queen and 2 bishops. What's the point? It simply moves the game towards the end faster with ...


1

Perhaps "Wildcatters" as shown on the website of CapStone Games. This link is the game on BGG. Oil tanker minis: Spherical gas storage tank minis:


1

There are only two strategic decisions over which a player has control: the amounts bid in auction and the quantity of cards traded. A winning strategy requires paying less on average for one's cards than (all) the other players; and then having a bit of luck. So, based on whatever patterns seem to be discernible in the merchant's average choice of how ...


1

You're right that there should be no reason for players to openly trade in a 2-player game. One option you could have is a compulsory trade at the end of each round in which each player chooses one card that they want to get rid of. However, there is a 2-player trading game called Jaipur, in which both players trade with a central board of five cards, but ...


1

Catan Junior uses a third-party to assist in trading. There are five types of resources you can gather. The marketplace starts with one of each resource. On your turn, you can trade one time with the marketplace. Once the marketplace ends up with all 5 of the same resource, it resets to its initial state. From a game theory perspective, an optional ...


1

How about Traders of Genoa? This is a game of trading, wares, and negotiation. The players take the roles of traders in Genoa in the 16th century. They fulfill orders, deliver messages, and take ownership of buildings in the city. Of course, this is not possible without the help of the other traders - thus, the need for clever negotiation. And ...


1

The other answers are right, only the active player draws cards. So the standard-rules make it possible that you empty your hand through trades. The extension Ladybohn offers a rule variation. Instead of the active player drawing three cards, everyone draws one card at the end of the turn. That makes the game faster for higher numbers of players. We usually ...


1

When futures trading with resources we invoke a rule that the moment the player receives the resource in question they must immediately give that resource to the player they traded with. This eliminates most of the potential problems people have had with this form of trading.


1

With everyone I've played with, future trades are looked down on as being slightly against the spirit of the rules, and certainly not expected to be actually paid back, although sometimes they are. We certainly would dislike meta-gaming, and carrying trust of players across different games of Catan.


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