5

The smaller amount of information in Spades means it is hard to purposefully start a finesse, but you can still easily continue one if it is started by accident. For example, your partner happens to lead small and first opponent plays small, and you are holding the AQ. You can now play the Q and hope that the K is not in the remaining opponent's hand. In ...


4

The rules (in most spades rulesets) prohibit showing your cards, yes. That said, what you describe is a pretty common practice in friendly games, as (as you note) the rest of the hand's play is foregone. Note the Wiki entry's inclusion of the TRAM section (added in 2012, with no cited sources) also includes a paragraph on penalties for doing so ...


4

TLDR: The probability is about 8%. Distribution of diamonds for any deal With no restrictions at all then dealing a pack between four hands results in the following probabilities for distributions of diamonds: (0, 0, 0, 13): 0.00% or ~1/158753389900 (0, 0, 1, 12): 0.00% or ~1/313123057 (0, 0, 2, 11): 0.00% or ~1/8697863 (0, 0, 3, 10): 0.00% or ~1/646948 (...


4

A low/high sum of bids can mean anything. The sum of 4,4,4,3 is the same as 1,1,1,12 (exaggeration), but those two mean completely different things. Instead of looking at the sum of the bids, you get more information from looking at the individual bids. It's safe to say that an Ace or king of any suit is likely to take the trick it is played in. As ...


3

Spades and Contract Bridge share most of the same mechanics as far as play of the cards are concerned, and this has long been a matter of disagreement between experts. Also, the style of playing from AKx bears on what is appropriate from lower touching honours. Three main styles have developed in Bridge: Traditional: Highest from touching honours at the ...


3

Q: Trump suit here means that even if the category of the card is lowest, it will be considered higher than ACE too? A. Yes. By category, you mean Rank. Any card in the Trump suit is stronger than any non-trump suit card. Q: What is the "first trick"? What is the meaning of "card may be led"? A. in a trick each player play 1 card. The stronger of the 4 ...


2

Finesses are all about considering the risk. In the example Benjamin notes, where partner plays low, right-hand opponent (RHO) plays low, and you hold AQ, you have a choice. You can play Q, which has a 67% chance of winning (with no other information), or you can play A, which has a 100% chance of winning but promotes the opponents' K to a trick 33% of the ...


2

This is a common play, called: The rest are mine (TRAM). Wikipedia: A common play among more experienced or skilled players is for a player who realizes that he cannot help but win all remaining tricks to simply lay down his hand and declare "the rest are mine" or similar. This is known as "TRAMing", and can help speed up the game.


2

This procedure, called Claiming or Conceding as the case may be, is common in Contract Bridge (both Rubber and Tournament). However it is also error prone for beginners and can be used unethically by those morally challenged. In consequence there are several Laws governing the process to protect both sides. When playing casual Bridge all players typically ...


2

In addition to Forget I was ever here's answer, it's appropriate to bid to 14+ tricks where your hand is disproportionately strong by itself (like comfortably bid 7 or more) and no one bids nil. This doesn't happen too often, since monster hands for one player usually mean that someone else is bidding nil which can change bidding and play patterns. Very ...


2

There are no hard and fast rules or heuristics for such a decision, but the following indicators will tend to be positive in such a circumstance: When one is clearly the strongest player in the game. Strong players play well and weak players play poorly, of course; but under stress of an overbid deal weak players can be expected, typically, to exaggerate ...


1

Yes, and the tables are used in exactly this way by Contract Bridge analysts and experts. However, be careful when extrapolating from these tables to perform analysis based on your own holding in any suit, not just the suit under examination. The formulas for properly calculating conditional probabilities are non-intuitive. A good first test that you are ...


1

You've described something similar to Top Trumps and its many different versions. When a player wins a trick however they add it to their deck rather than hand but the principle is similar to what you have described.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible