2

The scenario:

  • Turkish army in Moscow move to St Petersburg

  • Turkish army in Livonia support Moscow to St Petersburg

  • English army in St Petersburg hold

  • English army in Prussia move to Livonia

  • German army in Warsaw move to Prussia

  • German army in Silesia support Warsaw to Prussia

I (Turkey) would have expected to get into St Petersburg, as the disruption from Prussia -> Livonia was prevented by Warsaw -> Prussia, but actually I didn't get into St Petersburg.

Can anyone clarify if this is correct, and why?

Thanks

1

Each unit has one potential action each phase. But each year has five phases:

  1. Spring movement
  2. Spring disband/retreat (if needed)
  3. Fall movement
  4. Fall disband/retreat (if needed)
  5. Build/break (if needed)

Dislodged units (normally) still cut support. Because they cut support in the movement phase and are dislodged in the retreat/disband phase. There are a few exceptions where support is not cut, but that is not for this setting.

In this case, we have 6 units with their orders:

enter image description here

Let's first check the support orders:

  • Turkey: A lvn Supports A mos -> stp. This support is cut because of (A pru -> lvn).
  • Germany: A sil Supports A war -> pru This suport succeeds.

Next the moves.

  • Turkey: A mos -> stp (unsupported so strength 1, fails because A stp holds with strength 1).
  • England: A stp Holds (succeeds)
  • England: A pru -> lvn (move fails, but still cuts support)
  • Germany: A war -> pru (supported strength 2 so the move succeeds).

The failed orders are shown below:

enter image description here

Now it is time for retreats/disbands

  • England: A pru is dislodged and can only move to Berlin.

This is the relevant quote from the rules:

A unit being dislodged by one province can still cut support in another province. Just as a unit being dislodged by one province can still cause a standoff in another, a unit still manages to cut support even if it’s dislodged. Just make sure that the dislodgment isn’t coming from the province where the unit is giving support. (Remember this rule: A dislodged unit, even with support, has no effect on the province that dislodged it.)

0

Straight from the rules:

A unit being dislodged by one province can still cut support in another province. Just as a unit being dislodged by one province can still cause a standoff in another, a unit still manages to cut support even if it’s dislodged. Just make sure that the dislodgment isn’t coming from the province where the unit is giving support. (Remember this rule: A dislodged unit, even with support, has no effect on the province that dislodged it.)

In Diagram 18, even though the German Army in Munich is dislodged by a Russian attack, it’s still able to cut the support of the Russian Army in Silesia. This prevents the Russian Army in Prussia from entering Berlin.

Diagram 18

The example provided in the rules is isomorphic to the example you describe. Germany's "Army Munich to Silesia" in Diagram 18 is the equivalent of your English "Army Prussia to Livonia". Though it is dislodged, it still cuts support on an attack on another province.

The exception to this (noted by the rules) is if in your situation, Turkey had issued: "Army Livonia supports Warsaw to Prussia". In this case, the support would not be cut by "Army Prussia to Livonia" because a unit doesn't cut support on an attack on it's own province unless it dislodges the supporting unit.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.