17

The short version is that a legacy game is a game that is played as a campaign, where you finish the game multiple times over the life of the campaign. Legacy games are generally played with the same group of players and permanent changes will happen based on the result of each session. As you play this means the game will get a different feeling and at the ...


7

Yes, depending on how your group places their stickers. Initially, the game makes the Australia problem worse, not better. This happens because a player wins when they have 4 Victory Points instead of when they remove all opposition. It is relatively easy to sit back and consolidate your forces in Australia, then attack to get 2-3 Victory Points in a single ...


5

A complete list of what is in each packet can be found in this PDF I have made publicly available. I wasn't able to find any one distinct source, however by reconstructing the starting powers with the help of this question Which Faction Power will result in the greatest bonus troops and/or fewest troop losses? and reading a series of blogposts giving a ...


5

Missiles change a die into a '6' only. A missile can never modify a die to anything else. Perhaps a non-spoilerific example might clarify. An attack roll on a Ammo Shortage territory is 6,5,1 versus a defense roll of 5,5. The defender's high die is reduced by 1 because of the Ammo Shortage's -1 modifier making their roll 5,4. The defender uses a missile on ...


4

From BGG: Legacy Game - A multi-session game in which permanent and irreversible changes to the game state carry over to future plays. See BGG:Legacy for a list of 78 (and growing) of games with legacy mechanism.


4

Based on the implications in the rules, in order to conquer a territory it needs to be occupied. Conquering is only referred to on page 12 of the rules, which indicates that it is the action taken after successfully Attacking an occupied territory. Occupying an empty territory is referred to as Expanding by the rulebook on page 10.


4

It is a three to five player game according to the rules because the negotiation dynamics are integral to the rules. With two players there can be really no good negotiation and the game loses an essential element. Tweaking the game would definitely be needed, especially in regards to some items found in secret passages. So in the end, since you would play ...


3

All powers listed on the faction cards are active and available at all times, so once a come-back power or other sticker has been added to a faction card they are affected by it from then on.


3

Unfortunately, play-by-mail isn't really an appropriate medium to play Risk, for a number of reasons. Gameplay is too long, even when just considering playing in person. while only one player can "act" during a turn, defending players get to roll defending die on each attack choices to invade where, and in what quantity, are made by evaluating the whole ...


2

There are websites like http://www.conquerclub.com/ where you can make an account (you and your friend need both a account) and then you can play a round of risk. in a private game but also with other people that have an account there. Here are a few more sites where you also can play risk online. http://www.majorcommand.com/http://www.dominating12.com/ ...


2

The rules as written aren't completely unambiguous, but their meaning can be determined. Riots - Every player who controls a major city must roll a die, adding 1 to their roll for each troop and HQ in that territory. If your modified roll is lower than 6, remove troops equal to your natural die roll and DEMOLISH any HQs in that territory. DISCARD this ...


2

Yes, that is exactly what it means.


1

Yes. 3 Missiles in a Single Combat packet spoilers:


1

The card included in the packet covers what to do:


1

A bunker adds 1 to the highest defender's die as long as it is less than 6. For example, a defender's roll of 4+3 becomes 5+3; 5+5 becomes 6+5, 6+1 stays 6+1, and 2 becomes 3 (the case where you're only rolling one die). Note that this roughly flips the normal attacker's advantage - ordinarily, as long as both sides are rolling max dice, the attacker loses ...


1

Answering my own question: In fact, the event card rules are printed in the rulebook from the beginning, not revealed in an envelope. I wasn't able to review the rulebook until my group met again to play, but I'm glad that I checked for it there in time to play correctly.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible