8

A lot depends on your strength. I find that memorizing them is useful for me. I've also heard a lot of people suggest that you need to play them out on a real board. It helps teach your fingers where the pro moves are :) If you're not a dan-level player, you probably shouldn't focus too much on fighting sequences - you won't be able to understand all of ...


5

I don't know if they spend a lot of time doing point-value memorizing, but I would imagine that there is a reasonable amount of time spent studying and memorizing endgame tesuji. Counting is important to properly evaluate when the tesuji are profitable.


5

[Update: See end of post] I'm only 1 dan, so I'm just guessing. My idea for that move would be to avoid the attachment at M18. $$Bcm31 The board if black captures $$ --------------------------------------- $$ | . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . O O O X . . . . . . . . . . . . . | $$ | . . O X X X O . . O . X . . X . . . . | $$ | . O X , . X ....


4

I used to memorize games as a fairly large staple of my studies. Some general points: 1) The position at any point is approximately even. A "losing move" to a professional–one that everyone agrees is bad–is still probably close enough to even for anyone but a high-level dan. If you are at that point or getting close to it, be sure to look up the ...


4

Most pro games are fairly even until a "turning point." This is when one player makes a mistake, as related by the author of the game commentary, usually a pro. Sometimes the commentator is one of the players, who says, "I made move X that lost the game, or "My opponent's move Y lost him the game." Then the thing to do is to study the game up to the turning ...


4

Just to add a few notes in addition to Pieter's answer, and with a hint to your implied question (can AlphaGo beat Lee Sedol?): First off, I'm not sure if you thought being 9p automatically means being stronger than 2p. This is not the case. However, in this particular instance, other matters are of more importance. Fan Hui has not been competing in Asian (...


3

I believe your information comes from this unofficial rating system: http://www.goratings.org/ Fan Hui's page on that site: http://www.goratings.org/players/1480.html Fan Hui only only played a few pro games - none recently - so his ranking there (or any other pro ranking system) is unreliable. 1P-9P rankings are not ratings (you only go up) and don't ...


2

Yuan Zhou just published a book on this topic. Check out Slate and Shell for sample pages. I am a big fan of Zhou's books and will certainly buy this one. He has a nice way of writing towards kyu level players. Title: Learning from Pro Games Author: Zhou, Yuan Year: 2011 ISBN: 9781932001-57-0 Price: $20.00 http://www.slateandshell.com/SSYZ015.html


2

I will concentrate on the question 3 vs. a. While a move at a will also settle black's top left group, it helps the two white stones to make shape and build up pressure towards blacks top right corner. It also takes out other possibilities of attacking the two white stones like building a black wall towards the centre. On the other hand, 3 is a perfect move, ...


2

If I don't mistake professionals learn a lot of typical local value of moves it's a way to play faster and correctly endgames I suppose.


1

I am a novice player, so take everything I might say cautiously. But I have been working through "Invincible - The Games of Shusaku" by John Power and I think it has been helping me, even if there is a lot I don't understand yet. It is mostly commentaries on games from Honinbo Shusaku, who is arguably one of the greatest Go players. The one thing to ...


1

Is there any official and accessible world ranking ? No; Rankings are done by national Go organizations, with some variance existing between them. What is the exact rank of Fan Hui ? As reported here, Fan [Hui] earned a 2-dan professional ranking in China before emigrating to France, so it appears that go software has reached the level of ...


1

My impression is more that the emphasis is on reading (or counting) the endgame, rather than memorizing the endgame. Certainly in that process you see some positions so frequently that you basically memorize how they are going to fall out, but this isn't quite the same thing as deliberately setting out to memorize the position. This is especially the ...


1

Possibly the best book on endgames (for amateurs) was written by Tomoko Ogawa: http://www.gobooks.info/g15.html She doesn't exactly "memorize" endgame positions, but she gives a list a "typical" (and not so typical) positions, and teaches us how to COUNT them.


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