19

Send the rules. Fear of having your idea copied/stolen is a uniquely amateur mentality. Daniel Solis (designer) and Gil Hova (publisher who references other publishers) cover the topic well in their articles about this very topic. Additionally, there is this entry on BGG. They all conclude that you should not worry about someone stealing your idea. The ...


12

You probably need to contact a boardgame manufacturer, or prototyping service. Would probably run you about $2 a box. Board Game Design Print and Play productions Speilmaterial.de


12

Konami has general contact information for their offices. However, I highly doubt that they will accept unsolicited card suggestions. There are a couple of reasons for that: They are already paying people to design cards, and they have a lot more experience. If they were to accept fan-submitted cards, you would not be the only person submitting them. Konami ...


11

I think the easiest way to do this would be to use a stencil: Most craft shops should stock something like this. Paint the cork one colour, then use the stencil with a different colour / shade of paint (spray paint would probably be best).


11

When I've put out games in the past, there have usually been two goals in font selection: Fonts that are easy to read at the angle the player will be looking from. Fonts that evoke the setting of the game. For example, The Golden Wilderness is set in colonial California, so a typeface that was widely used in the 1700s helps evoke the setting. There's ...


9

If your game doesn't need any materials (or those would be more easily to come by on their own, such as graph paper), I would suppose the elements of your game you're trying to ship would be the rules. Since you're not trying to distribute them commercially, the only real problem is to get it out there. If I'm correct so far, here's what I'd do: Pick a ...


8

Your game is a CCG. What you do with the cards - the actual mechanics of the game - is irrelevant here. A game's "type" is metadata. It's defined, roughly speaking, by the central piece of "equipment" needed to play it: a board, a table, minis, role playing, dice, an AV system, or, in your case, cards. Subtype, if any, usually describes the central ...


8

There's publishers who only have in-house staff, there's ones who farm projects out to freelancers, and there's ones who buy games off designers. Some companies only use one of these models. Some companies use two or all three of these models. E.g., Buying Games from Designers: Richard Garfield went to Wizards of the Coast to try and sell them a ...


7

If the "board game map" is subject to copyright restrictions, then it is protected for 70 years in the USA. As a general rule, for works created after January 1, 1978, copyright protection lasts for the life of the author plus an additional 70 years. For an anonymous work, a pseudonymous work, or a work made for hire, the copyright endures for a term of ...


7

It depends, probably not at first. Most truly enduring games (Chess, Go, Reversi, even Magic: The gathering, etc) were originally for two players. But also most of them have variants that arose later that allow 4 players. In short, if adapting for more than 2 players is non-obvious, then it is probably not worth the initial effort. But if the game ...


7

Here are a couple EdX options. The first is about game design (both board and computer games). The second focuses on games meant for education. https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-game-design-mitx-11-126x https://www.edx.org/course/design-development-games-learning-mitx-11-127x


7

My first published game has a map of seven hexagonal tiles, so I have some experience with this. If you must have hex tiles (e.g. a case where the board layout is user-generated as in the 4x game E C L I P S E, not fixed as in Catan or as in my game), then I would buy a bunch of blank tiles from The Game Crafter or Amazon. Our earliest prototypes used ...


6

NanDeck will do this: http://www.nand.it/nandeck/ Lets you script out card sets, fairly simple to change card sizes, etc. The website Oil And Rope has a very slick prototyping tool called Paperize: http://paperize.io/beta which lets you upload graphics, use spreadsheet linking, etc. - super cool. Still in beta, but tons of folks love it.


5

Note that Wizards tends to be fairly secretive about the specifics of how their print runs work, and exactly what a print sheet looks like. We occasionally get articles like the one that Zags linked to showing an entire print sheet, but most of the information we 'know' about the print runs has to be inferred from answers Wizards employees give or ...


5

As a fellow aspiring Game Designer, I stick with word or excel for initial content. Use anything you are familiar with, as content is the only thing you should be worried about. Unless you plan to self publish, publishers are going to scrap your design for something that they'll get professionally made. If you do self publish, then I recommend sending it ...


4

Many kickstarter games (at least on the RPG side) have either demo modules or playtest rules, which you can read BEFORE committing. I've seen a couple on the boardgame side as well, where the rules PDF was posted; the kickstarter was for a nice set. I can see boardgames relying upon components to move stuff via kickstarter. Given the typical mode for ...


4

Now i had envisioned that every floor which has 10 spaces each would have a even number of tiles regardless of them being good,bad or special but once i divided the total number of tiles which is 88 with 20 the number of floors i got 4.4. Its logically impossible to have 4.4 tiles on each floor. How can i solve this problem. Have a different number of tiles,...


4

If you can't get a stencil (which I agree is the best way to do it), you could draw an equilateral triangular grid with horizontal, 60° left and 60° right lines, then just ink the hexes on them. 6 triangles = 1 hex, so be prepared to draw them small.


4

Check out this article on how magic cards are made: http://archive.wizards.com/magic/magazine/article.aspx?x=mtg/daily/feature/146 From this, we can identify several things: Magic cards are printed by a company called Carta Mundi. It appears Magic cards are printed in sheets. The oversized cards (from the commander sets) appear to be printed on 7x7 ...


4

I'd say the first place that jumps to mind for me is boardgamegeek.com This forum seems like an appropriate place to post your rules and materials: http://boardgamegeek.com/forum/26/boardgamegeek/board-game-design You might consider setting up a tumblr or some other website you control and link the materials and information in the forum.


4

That deal doesn't seem very likely. You plan to cover any expenses they may incur during production, marketing, and distribution, but I do not believe you have considered their opportunity cost for taking on the project. Whatever time and resources they are devoting to your game (even if you are footing the bill) could be spent elsewhere on a product with a ...


3

There are several methods. instead of tiles, cards. Less cost to produce.Benefit: cheapdrawback: usually not square. a pile of larger geomorphs with just the rooms, not the contents thereof; cards by room typeBenefit: sturdy board chunks, highly flexible modedrawback: rooms fall into well known patterns movable chunks of wall on a gridded boardBenefit: ...


3

Promoting a board game (design, prototype, print&play or kickstarter) should definitely involve BoardGameGeek, and similar communities. I could expand, but everything's covered in this article: http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/322382/game-design-self-publishing-resource-game-designer You should provide print&play materials for playtesting groups, to ...


3

Try this site , they can produce a lot of material for board game and after you can even use their online store for the distribution. https://www.thegamecrafter.com/


3

Currently in the US its 90 to 120 years or life of the author plus 70. US lawmakers keep extending the copyright so that Mickey Mouse doesn't go into the public domain. So anything printed in your life time won't be available in the public domain for a long time if you live in the US. The copyright owners can release it earlier, but you'd have to contact ...


3

You're far better off trying to kickstart your game if you don't think a publisher will go for it. But then you should be asking yourself why don't you think it's good enough? And if it isn't good enough, what can you do to make it good enough. In this day and age there are some fantastic games that have been released and your game needs to compete ...


3

Search for a case where this happened. A lot of game designers have this fear and it seems totally unsupported. Publishers would kill themselves if they did it, because nobody would give their rules to a a company that stole rules once. The board game scene is comparatively tiny and things like those will spread like wildfire.


2

There are several elements to a game... and most but not all are protectable. Exactly which varies widely from country to country. Some games that are explicitly legal reworks in the US are proven infringements in France, for example. You need to look at where you're writing at, and intending to sell to. Even where it's legal, plagiarism is still ...


2

I happened to come across this post in my daily search for innovative game design ideas. You might want to try this from lost garden. I am curious as to what you think? The original document you posted I use for developing large quantities of game concepts, so I am not sure if it exactly ideal for describing the design process. I would be interested though ...


2

Maybe this won't answer your question either, but it might get us closer. First, a short glance at Jason Bakker's "A GDD Template for the Indie Developer" will stress the need for Breaking down components, keeping it simple, lists are a great tool for knowing what you'll do (as in a To Do or shopping list). Analysis itself being key in the process of game ...


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