18

There are a variety of ways to level the playing field in chess. The two most common methods are material advantage and time odds, although there are also a number of more exotic handicaps that one can conceive of (e.g. giving away free moves, requiring a given piece to give checkmate, allowing the King to move two squares, etc). With material handicaps, ...


13

Some actions you can take, in increasing order of difficulty it will impose: Don't aim for the Longest Route. Don't draw from the visible options. This will reduce the 'skill' you can exercise, making your plays more dependent on luck. Don't use wild Cards to fill out a color set. Makes it harder to get the longer routes. Knowing that they may gather in ...


8

The idea behind playing in the upper right first is so that White doesn't have to reach far to play his first move. The corner immediately in front of him on his right is left open. So the third stone goes in the lower right corner, from Black's viewpoint. [Edit as per the comments: Move order for 9 stones] $$ --------------------------------------- $$| ....


6

Tweaking with the starting deck is a handicap that scales on most Kingdom setups and, in particular, replacing Copper(s) with Silver(s). Before analyzing this, here is why some other handicaps would not work: Deduct points: it's simple to apply, but not simple to design it, as it's arbitrary. You have to decide before the start of the game, but on what ...


6

In Edo period go, the system worked like this: Even: Taiga-sen (Alternating Black and White) One Dan difference: San-Ai-Sen (Black two out of three games) Two Dan difference: Josen (Always Black) Three Dan difference: Sen-Ni-Sen (Black two games, two stones on game) Four Dan difference: Sen-Ni (Alternating Black and two stones) Five Dan difference: (Always ...


5

Simply play a game with a fully open hand. All of your car cards, tickets are played face up. Pre anounce & explain your every move & intention openly to the novice player. This will not only serve as a handicap but will accelerate the rate at wich your novice players become seasoned players. This applies to all games you will teach to novices as I ...


5

One way to remove a first-player advantage (in general for any open-information game) is to let one player make a proposed first move. Then the other player can choose to play as either side. This is similar to splitting a cake by letting one person cut and one person choose. The first player cannot take too obviously powerful a first move, or the second ...


3

This sounds like a great game for younger kids - but it must play so fast that I wouldn't even worry about handicapping for first player. Simply play First and First sets of two games, each player going first once, and play for total tricks. In practice any advantage less than half a trick will require playing several games anyways, in order for the ...


3

Taking the black stones always implied a handicap, even before the invention of komi. It has been known for centuries that black had an advantage. I think the real question is how even games worked before komi. To my knowledge, there was no way to get actually even games. The main workaround I could think of would be repeated color switching. You may be be ...


3

Time limit and patience for the experienced player. If the experience player limits self to 15 to 30 seconds per play and is very patient with new players, the game levels without house or extensive rule changes. For new players to get-into-the-game, competition is not needed so much as enjoyment. For a seasoned competitor, obliging a quick play (and ...


3

One of the interesting ways of adding a “handicap” without breaking the balance is to make some promises. So you would playing the standard rules, but in a way to make your life harder. Destination Tickets As a minor handicap you could say that you wouldn't discard any Destination Tickets on start. A bit more serious — when getting new Destination Tickets ...


3

There are two handicap rules I play with to even out skill levels with kids (who otherwise know how to play). The first is that the experienced player(s) lose all of the cards they invested if a tunnel fails to be completed (as opposed to the cards returning to the players hand). The second is to not let station placement count against the kids' scores, so ...


2

Descent is balanced towards the heroes, if certain conditions are met: Played with 4 Heroes, regardless of actual player count Descent scales terribly. The actions of all 4 heroes are necessary to counter the spawn rate of the overlord and all 4 pair of eyes are necessary to see enough of the dungeon to restrict spawning locations. A balanced quest is ...


2

I suggest the stronger player secretly applies a handicapping rule to themselves. The problem with some of the other handicaps (especially the simple victory points handicap) is that it's not a particularly satisfying victory for the weaker player, and can feel patronising. I suggest rules like: Never take sheep. Never take 'Starting player' action. ...


2

A "third" handicap other than material or time is a "propositional" game. An example is that you lose (or cannot win) if you have lost all your pawns before administering checkmate, no matter what else happens. That proposition would lead you to play out your pawns more conservatively at the beginning of the game, and perhaps not use pawn storms. Other ...


2

Try something new. A new opening, or relying overmuch on an unusual piece. This works best when the junior opponent knows how to play and is getting the hang of your usual opening, but you are still better. Try something wild and new, it might be a disaster, it might actually work, either way you might both learn something. PS - Especially fun in ...


2

There are a few handicap ideas I use: Material Advantage Time Advantage Swapping colors midway through the game Material Advantage: Depends on the difference in skill of the two players. For beginners playing against moderately good players, you can take off whole pieces such as Queens, or Knights (since Knights are notoriously good against beginners due ...


2

Generally, score handicaps are the way to go. You don't have to worry about playing games and experimenting in order to find a balance, you can just use the knowledge you already have of how much you tend to win by. Money handicap could possibly work, but I think it'd be pretty tough - you only have so much room to adjust before it basically becomes a "you ...


2

Depending on the edition (60s or 90s), you can handicap for the Japanese by: 60s: allow Japanese player to start a day (or partial day) sooner than the American player 90s: allow Japanese player to bring forces onto the board closer to Midway (ie, shorten the time available to sink them) Handicapping for the American player really isn't needed in the ...


1

You can record your matches - including handicaps, so that the winner is the winner - on our platform rankade. It's a free ranking system for sports and games, suitable for Chess, Go, Scrabble, and more. Rankade doesn't use Elo, but its algorithm (called ree algorithm), although more complex (here's a comparison), is similar to Elo if you play 1-on-1 matches ...


1

An alternative is to handicap the premium costs for early development This could be implemented for stronger players as: +$1 or +$2 for every spot +$1 or +$2 for every spot except the last free spot +$1 or +$2 for every spot except both free spots Or for weaker players as $1 or $2 less for every spot $1 or $2 less for every spot except the last free spot ...


1

Nations is a board game that has a high ranking on BoardGameGeek (currently ranked 7.97 out of 10 and ranked as the 39th favorite board game) that has a handicap system built in. As part of the initial setup each player selects the difficulty level they wish to play by placing a player disk of their color on the desired level. This difficulty level ...


1

Why not do something simple like taking away some points from each word that the more experienced player scores? You could do it as a set amount of points per word which would mean low scoring words wouldn't count. Or you could set it as a percentage of each word meaning higher point count words wouldn't be worth as much. Both of these methods could help ...


1

If one player were clearly one stone weaker, he would ALWAYS take Black (with a "free" first move). If the players were regarded as even in strength, they would alternate taking Black. There was even an "intermediate" handicap where the weaker player would take Black, say, two times out of three.


1

After the four corners are accounted for, the fifth stone goes to the center point. If it is a six stone handicap, there is no center stone, but two stones (above four) go in the middle of the left and right sides. The seventh stone goes back to the center. If there are eight stones, the four stones (above four) go to the middle of the left and right sides,...


1

It sounds like your newer players' disadvantage will be mostly in the deck creation phase of the draft. I suggest handicapping the experienced players in this phase. Impose a time limit per pick on the experienced players Impose a time limit for deck creation after the draft on the experienced players Give the new players more flexibility around side ...


1

At the professional level, rank differences are very slight. ON AVERAGE, it may take a three or four rank difference in pro rank to equal one stone. But ranks are largely a matter of achievements; how many games or tournaments you've won. It could be that a gifted "newcomer" (few victories, hence relatively low rank) is actually stronger than a higher ...


1

At the start of the game after seeing the available kingdom cards, allow the junior player(s) to choose a kingdom card the senior player(s) will be disallowed from gaining by any means this game. For a harsh handicap, ban the senior player(s) from two or even more cards. This forces you into your "second strategy".


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