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61

Preface: I've been drafting this for a few days now. I focused on the cards that were banned, because those were the most broken. I'm sure there were dozens of other combos not included here, and this is by no means giving the fullest extent of how the cards could be used to maximize their broken-ness. The first step is to take a look at what cards were ...


20

Strangely, Wikipedia had this information: Paths of Glory (August 19, 2001 - February 20,2002) Tigris and Euphrates (February 20, 2002 - 2002) Puerto Rico (2002 - August 2008) Agricola (August 2008 - December 2010) Twilight Struggle (January 2011 - December 2015) Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 (January 2016 - Present). As Jefromi's answer ...


19

AlphaGo Now there is AlphaGo by Deep Mind, a company recently bought by Google playing currently a match against 9p Lee Sedol. It is the Deep Blue of Go. EDIT: The final result of the match of five games was AlphaGo 4 – Lee Sedol 1. This confirms the former conjecture: AlphaGo is the Deep Blue of Go.


14

There have been several times in MtG history that the game was broken for a while. Black Summer, with the proliferation of Necropotence decks, Affinity decks that abused cheap artifacts and artifact lands, and Combo Winter that resulted in the largest number of bannings. Mark Rosewater discusses why cards get banned and restricted. While not all the cards ...


12

I played during combo winter. Some of the responses are good, but a couple issues. For example, when Urza's Saga was printed, 5th Edition was the Standard core set. So no one ran Grim Monolith; it was too expensive. Everybody used Mana Vault (it was printed in 5th). So a typical Academy build would look something like this: 4 Ancient Tomb 4 City of ...


12

A definitive answer would require someone who has a collection of all the printing of UNO since the beginning in 1971 to present day. The only one likely to have such an museum quality collection is the estate of the inventor of the game, Merle Robbins, an Ohio barber. He spent $8,000 to have 5,000 copies made. He sold the rights to the game to International ...


12

If you scrape all the versions of the current browse page on archive.org (that's sorted by geek rating, right?), you get this: 2009-02-05 Agricola (2007) 2010-04-07 Puerto Rico (2002) 2010-11-05 Agricola (2007) 2010-11-21 Puerto Rico (2002) 2011-01-06 Twilight Struggle (2005) 2011-01-16 Puerto Rico (2002) 2011-02-03 Twilight Struggle (2005) 2016-01-01 ...


10

There are a number of different hands that have a specific name. For example, A-2-3-4-5 is called a Wheel. The Royal Flush obviously gets its name from being the highest hand, and specifically having royalty in it (although one could argue so does a King high.) As for the mistake of ranking of Straight Flush being lower than 4 of a kind, this is easily ...


9

Having spent a little while looking into this, the only clear thing is that there is no firm evidence for any distant historical first date for Tic Tac Toe. Although many people claim the Romans played this game, in the form of Terni Lapilli, and point to the large number of historical boards that exist, scratched into walls, this seems unlikely, not least ...


8

History of these ancient boardgames is a bit murky due to their really old age. The wikipedia article on Hnefatafl is a good starting point, but you can already see from that how vague the information is. Hnefatafl being played since around 400 is certainly older than Chess. In fact, it can be considered a predecessor of Chess. A not so easy relation is ...


8

According to the Candy Land 50th Anniversary Edition Rules: 1985: “The Legend of the Lost Candy Castle” story and characters introduced to game. I presume, Since Lord Licorice is the antagonist of that story, that he was introduced then. 'They'll never find the hidden King or his Castle,' Lord Licorice says sourly... 'for I have hidden them from sight ...


8

This has most likely been passed down throughout the generations as "the way to do it", without any actual backing reasons, but there are some situations where it is beneficial to put the money under the edge of the game board. Small playing areas (such as a small table) where space is at a minimum, so it makes sense to conserve space by putting money under ...


8

The printed text of Circu, Dimir Lobotomist says "target library". The same rules update that changed the rule you quoted also errata'd that card to say "target player's library".


7

Wikipedia has an entry on the History of Chess. It states that the differences between what is now modern chess began in Europe in the 15th century. Besides the name changes for the pieces, the rules differed. The section covering The Indo-Arabic game appears to reference, Murray H.J.R. 1913. The history of chess. Oxford. reprint ISBN 0-936317-01-9 In ...


7

In the seafarers expansion, you cannot move or build a ship to or from a hex containing the pirate. This could be where the house-rule applying to the robber too came from, by blocking land-based building rather than sea-based building.


7

I am almost certain this is a UK / US difference. Specifically, I believe it was named this way because of a marketing decision by the US publisher. Research: Although Agricola's creator is Uwe Rosenberg: "a German game designer", the main publisher is Mayfair Games: "an American publisher of board, card, and roleplaying games" As you mentioned "All ...


6

Others have already mentioned the general history of the three games, but I can add a bit about hnefatafl itself. The game seems to have similarities to an earlier Roman game, ludus latrunculorum, which was descended from an ancient Greek game, petteia. Both of these older games shared hnefatafl's straight-line move and its capture method of surrounding ...


6

In Edo period go, the system worked like this: Even: Taiga-sen (Alternating Black and White) One Dan difference: San-Ai-Sen (Black two out of three games) Two Dan difference: Josen (Always Black) Three Dan difference: Sen-Ni-Sen (Black two games, two stones on game) Four Dan difference: Sen-Ni (Alternating Black and two stones) Five Dan difference: (Always ...


6

There seems to be surprisingly little information about the origin of the name "Chinese Checkers". The game itself was first released in 1892 in Germany as "Stern-Halma" (literally "Star-Halma"), indicating that it was a variation of Halma that was played on a star-shaped board. But there doesn't seem to be any solid information about why the name "Chinese ...


6

[Note: This answer focuses on the history of this subject, citing some famous examples, as opposed to contemporary propagandistic games, which I have no doubt exist, although I can't comment on the anonymity issue. Generally, designers are proud to be associated with such games, but we do seem to be entering a new era of propaganda, with definite emphasis on ...


6

Dingus Egg was banned once upon a time, and it does 2 damage to the land's controller when a land is put into the graveyard from play. A few of these do a lot of damage per land, I've seen it in a few land destruction decks over the years. It's not currently banned in any formats it would otherwise be legal in.


6

If Reddit is to be believed, there was a person at a German regional tournament who thoroughly abused this by bringing a deck with 2222 cards (enough for about 740 cards with 3 duplicates each). To make matters worse, as many cards as possible were added so that the deck had to be shuffled during the game as often as possible. While it was definitely poor ...


6

If the box looks like the images below, I'd say it's from the 1950's which is when all the mentions of a board with that trademark number appear to be dated. I've found examples estimated at 1955 and 1957 for year of production (linked below). http://www.cathyscollectables.co.uk/pages/...


6

The answer is #3. i.e. There was a deck long ago, that exploited affinity. That deck has slowly changed over the years as the card pool has changed. As those changes have occurred, the original reliance on affinity as a mechanic has reduced, but the name has stuck. References: https://www.mtgsalvation.com/forums/the-game/modern/established-modern/aggro-...


5

I'm going to use a bit of lateral thinking to answer this question - since our site is Board Games: Stack Exchange but we spend about half our time here talking about card games, hopefully a trading card game is a valid answer. The biggest ever "board/card game flop" that I can think of is Netrunner. Given that Magic the Gathering had recently been such a ...


5

I realize I'm a year and change too late, but for anyone who stumbles across this post, just run a few games with the following list and you'll get it: 3 Dream Halls 4 Mind Over Matter 4 Grim Monolith 3 Thran Dynamo 4 Voltaic Key 4 Lotus Petal 3 Mox Diamond 4 Windfall 3 Turnabout 4 Tolarian Academy 12 Island 4 Memory Jar 4 Time ...


5

I never thought of it, but now that you do mention it, I do recall sliding Monopoly money under the board separated by denomination (as a kid in the 80s). The best reason I can think for why we did that is that it was simply fun to pretend you were pulling money out of a cash register. You could argue it made making change or putting together amounts faster, ...


5

I believe it might refer to Bishopsgate, it was used as a goods (freight) station, near Shoreditch in Londons East End. ( I'm an old Cockney.)


5

Very unlikely It is impossible to prove a negative, especially one regarding anonymity, but I'm going to go out on a limb and say that this is unlikely to have happened. There have definitely been games explicitly published for political (e.g. Corporate Battles, Daring Eagle) or religious agendas (e.g. 5Pillars, Armor of God). However, those don't do ...


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